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NDA-GS-Geography-Atlantic ocean currents   L 1
 
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NDA-GS-Geography-Atlantic ocean currents L 1
Views: 2081 edudoos
Trick to remember Atlantic ocean currents
 
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Very easy trick to remember ocean currents
Views: 60802 TRICKS
Geography for UPSC CSE - Ocean Currents [Civil Services]
 
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To watch all lessons click here:- https://goo.gl/0IFG3l | Download the Unacademy Learning App from the Google Play Store here:- https://goo.gl/02OhYI | Discuss the course with fellow aspirants here:- https://goo.gl/Xa2mqw The lesson covers the concept of tides, how tides are generated, types of tides and tidal energy. This lesson will be extremely beneficial to those who are preparing for UPSC Civil Services Examination CSE (for IAS, IPS, IRS etc.), State Civil Services Examination (conducted by RPSC, UPPSC, MPPSC and so on), other examination conducted by UPSC and other government bodies which includes questions on General Knowledge, Current affairs, general awareness, General studies. It will also cover other related exams like Central Police Forces Exam (Assistant Commandant), SSC (Staff Selection Commission- Combined Graduate Level exams), Bank PO exams like IBPS, SBI and RBI exams, Combined Defence Service exam (CDS), ACIO (Assistant Central Intelligence Officer) etc. For more lessons on UPSC CSE Preparation, please visit:- https://unacademy.in/upsc-preparation/all/
Views: 191914 Unacademy
Ocean Current Flows around the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic
 
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NASA time lapse simulation showing sea surface currents around western Europe. The visualization covers 11 months, with each second in the video representing 2.75 days. The different colours represent current depths - white flows are nearest the surface, and darker colours running deeper. Credits: Visuals: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio Music: Kevin MacLeod, "Peace of Mind", Incompetech.com Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 76492 EarthDirect
Ocean Currents
 
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This video explains in detail the phenomenon of ocean currents and their role in nature. This is a product of Mexus Education Pvt. Ltd., an education innovations company based in Mumbai, India. http://www.mexuseducation.com, http://www.ikenstore.in
Views: 259135 Iken Edu
OCEAN CURRENTS || Types, Circulation Patterns, Theories, Mapping & much more
 
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This is a Must Watch video for those who are preparing for any Entrance Exam. #UPSC #StatePSC #SSC Hit the like button and Subscribe if you enjoyed watching this Video. SUBSCRIBE to CivilCoursify's Youtube Channel. Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJ7czAlpYL2ePjJpNxLuwxQ?sub_confirmation=1 Download the FREE CivilCoursify Android App from the Google PlayStore Now. Link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.civilcoursify&hl=en You can Join various Courses at CivilCoursify to prepare for Entrance Exams for FREE. Join here: https://www.civilcoursify.in/all-courses/ Follow us on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/civilcoursify/ Join our Channel on Telegram: https://goo.gl/xREZnT
Views: 100072 CivilCoursify
The Gulf Stream Explained
 
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Learn about the role of the sea in global warming. The global conveyer belt is part of the large-scale ocean circulation that is driven by differences in the density of the waters. It plays a key role in keeping the climate at balance and Europe warm. Global warming may change it forever with unforeseeable consequences. Short videos, explaining things. For example Evolution, the Universe, Stock Market or controversial topics like Fracking. Because we love science. We would love to interact more with you, our viewers to figure out what topics you want to see. If you have a suggestion for future videos or feedback, drop us a line! :) We're a bunch of Information designers from munich, visit us on facebook or behance to say hi! https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://www.behance.net/kurzgesagt The climate change and global conveyor belt Also: We made a brief intro for kurzgesagt videos! Tell us how what you think about it :D Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
World strongest ocean current in action, Maelstrom Saltstraumen
 
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Saltstraumen is a small strait with the strongest tidal current in the world. It is located in the municipality of Bodø in Nordland county, Norway. It is located about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) southeast of the town of Bodø. The narrow channel connects the outer Saltfjorden to the large Skjerstadfjorden between the islands of Straumøya and Knaplundsøya. The Saltstraumen Bridge on Norwegian County Road 17 crosses the Saltstraumen. SUBSCRIBE to my YouTube channel for more great videos: http://www.youtube.com/norwegianrobot Saltstraumen has the strongest tidal current in the world. Up to 400,000,000 cubic metres (520,000,000 cu yd) of seawater forces its way through a 3-kilometre (1.9 mi) long and 150-metre (490 ft) wide strait every six hours, with water speeds reaching 22 knots (41 km/h; 25 mph). Vortices known as whirlpools or maelstroms up to 10 metres (33 ft) in diameter and 5 metres (16 ft) in depth are formed when the current is at its strongest. Saltstraumen has existed for about two to three thousand years. Before that, the area was different due to post-glacial rebound. The current is created when the tide tries to fill the Skjerstadfjorden. The height difference between the sea level and the fjord inside can be up to 1 metre (3 ft 3 in). When the current turns, there is a period when the strait is navigable. The Saltstraumen is popular with anglers, due to its abundance of fish such as saithe, cod, wolffish, rose fish, and halibut. Coalfish is a specialty of the area. The largest documented coalfish of 22.7 kilograms (50 lb) was caught in the Saltstraumen on a fishing rod. The remains of a 10,000-year-old hunter settlement in the area are the oldest known traces of human settlement in Bodø, and also one of the oldest archaeological discoveries in Norway. These hunters lived on the edge of the ice, attracted by the abundance of fish caused by the strong currents. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRobot_ Website: http://www.skjelstad.net
Views: 83980 Thomas S
New Studies Show Ocean Currents Are Weakening, Could Lead To More Extreme Climate | Mach | NBC News
 
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According to two new studies an Atlantic Ocean current that helps regulate the global climate has reached a more than 1,000-year low. This could mean more extreme weather across the Northern hemisphere as well as increased sea level along the U.S East Coast. They could also have an impact on ocean ecosystems that rely heavily on ocean currents for their food supply. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and original digital videos. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations. Connect with NBC News Online! Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Google+: http://nbcnews.to/PlusNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC Follow NBC News on Pinterest: http://nbcnews.to/PinNBC New Studies Show Ocean Currents Are Weakening, Could Lead To More Extreme Climate | Mach | NBC News
Views: 2808 NBC News
Atlantic and Pacific oceans joining at a point in mid ocean but do not mix each other | Unbelievable
 
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On the temperature, salinity, and density differences between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans in the upper kilometre. Abstract The surface of the Pacific Ocean stands about 40 cm higher than the Atlantic Ocean with respect to the 1000-decibar surface, and the North Atlantic and North Pacific stand respectively about 14 and 17 cm higher than the South Atlantic and Pacific. The North Atlantic is warmest and saltiest, the South Atlantic is coldest and densest, and the North Pacific is least dense and least salty. The extreme values in temperature and salinity of the North Atlantic are probably related to the formation of the deep water there, which carries away from the upper layer the cold water of relatively low salinity. If this water spreads into the South Atlantic at depth and is replaced with warm saline surface water from the South Atlantic via the South Equatorial Current and the Gulf Stream, then the South Atlantic should be substantially cooler and less salty. The difference in density and sea level of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans may stem from the difference in latitude of the southern tips of America, Africa, and Australia, and the constriction of the west wind drift at Drake Strait. Only the densest surface waters of the Pacific pass through to the Atlantic, while lighter waters from lower latitudes of the South Atlantic pass eastward south of Africa. Further, the constriction of the flow by Drake Strait may result in a higher sea level on the Pacific side through the effect of Windstau (Montgomery, 1938). The density difference between the southern and northern oceans may be partly a consequence of the west wind drift around Antarctica. This is the greatest current of all oceans. Its flow is approximately geostrophically balanced and the surface slopes down to the south. The northern west wind drifts are not so strong, are at lower latitudes, and the high latitude flow is westward with slope upward to the north. These differences are not confined to the upper thousand metres. The average density difference between the Atlantic and the Pacific from the surface to the bottom is about 17 × 10−5 g/cm3. Referred to some deep surface such as 4000 decibars, the Pacific stands about 68 cm higher than the Atlantic.
Views: 810703 EE
Amazing Facts About Gulf Of Alaska Where 2 Oceans Meet But Dont Mix
 
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Amazing Facts About Gulf Of Alaska Where 2 Oceans Meet But Dont Mix .gulf of alaska where two oceans meet gulf of alaska where two oceans meet underwater . These are gulf of alaska facts . So here is where two seas meet but don t mix . Well its not an indian ocean meets atlantic ocean video because it is gulf of alaska oceans meet video which contains . Atlantic ocean And pacific ocean meet at this point. Hope you will like the video thanks for watching and don't forget to subscribe and let me know any other video you want me to make in the comments Subscribe to our channel : https://goo.gl/qCiemj Join us on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Informii-786719934773878/ Follow us on Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/informii/ Follow us on twitter : https://twitter.com/informiii
Views: 761623 informii
Gulf Stream & Labrador Currents Collide! Cape Point, OBX, NC
 
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Cape Point is where two major North American currents come together. The Gulf Stream is a warm southern current that attracts subtropical and big game species, while the Labrador Current is a cold natured current that originates in the northern section of the continent. Along the ocean waters off of Cape Point, these two major currents meet, intersect, and create miles-long series of shifting sandbars and water conditions that attract a variety of saltwater fish.
Views: 10068 Pahuta Lawn Care
Gulf Stream and the Next Ice Age - Documentary
 
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The Gulf Stream and The Next Ice Age is about the consequences of global warming on The Great Atlantic Conveyor, which has to do with regulating climate and the fear that the melting of ice will stop it, perhaps triggering an ice age. In the battle against climate change there is no enemy to fight, just our attitudes. - Nicolas Koutsikas, Director. Climate Change is hot on the political and social agenda internationally. Our climate is changing, with industrial production, habitat, transport and everyday human activities acknowledged as causes of global warming. The Gulf Stream and the Next Ice Age is a one-hour documentary which explores the results of a recent American government report that believes the collapse of thermohaline circulation will take place around the year 2010 and impose a minor ice age on Europe. Could Dublin acquire a climate like Spitzberg, and London like that of Siberia? The Gulf Stream is a powerful surface current, driven by the Trade Winds. Its origins lie in the Gulf of Mexico and it carries the tropical waters from the Florida Strait to the great banks of the United States, where it heads eastward, carrying its warm waters to the borders of the North Atlantic. As soon as the tropical waters hit the Arctic Ocean, they cool abruptly and plunge towards the abyssal zone to form a loop, known as "thermohaline circulation." Then, like an immense conveyor belt that slows down in the ocean depths, it sets out again southward to rejoin the beginning of the Gulf Stream. Actors: Paul Belle Directors: Nicolas Koutsikas, Stephan Poulle Producteur : Grand Angle Productions
Views: 279146 Best Documentary
G5/P3: Ocean Currents, Waves and Upwelling
 
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Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Motion of ocean water: horizontal (waves and currents), vertical (upwelling and tides) 2. Ocean currents: meaning, importance, distribution and factors responsible. 3. Effect of Insolation and Salinity gradients on the ocean currents 4. Factor modifying the ocean currents: coastline and coriolis force 5. Ocean currents of the world 6. North Atlantic currents 7. New foundland islands – meeting of warm and cold currents 8. Effect of North Atlantic drift, Effect of Canary current 9. Sargasso Sea 10. South Atlantic currents 11. Meeting of warm and cold currents at Bahia Blanca, New Foundland Islands, Japanese Coast 12. Currents of North Atlantic, South Atlantic, North Indian Ocean, South Indian Ocean 13. Solution of UPSC Prelim Questions from 1997, 2002, 2012 and 2013. 14. Up-welling: Ekman layer, Ekman spiral, Ekman transport and their impact 15. Peruvian coast and other major Upwelling regions of the world 16. Down welling: meaning and Effects Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF Faculty Name: Ms. Rajtanil Solanki Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India
Views: 359255 Mrunal Patel
Major Global Ocean Currents
 
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Major Global Ocean Currents at the surface (red) and bottom of the ocean (blue) To learn more visit the CMEMS website: http://marine.copernicus.eu Video Produced through: Mercator Ocean https://www.mercator-ocean.fr/en/
NASA: The Thermohaline Circulation (The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt) [720p]
 
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The oceans are mostly composed of warm salty water near the surface over cold, less salty water in the ocean depths. These two regions don't mix except in certain special areas. The ocean currents, the movement of the ocean in the surface layer, are driven mostly by the wind. In certain areas near the polar oceans, the colder surface water also gets saltier due to evaporation or sea ice formation. In these regions, the surface water becomes dense enough to sink to the ocean depths. This pumping of surface water into the deep ocean forces the deep water to move horizontally until it can find an area on the world where it can rise back to the surface and close the current loop. This usually occurs in the equatorial ocean, mostly in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. This very large, slow current is called the thermohaline circulation because it is caused by temperature and salinity (haline) variations. This animation shows one of the major regions where this pumping occurs, the North Atlantic Ocean around Greenland, Iceland, and the North Sea. The surface ocean current brings new water to this region from the South Atlantic via the Gulf Stream and the water returns to the South Atlantic via the North Atlantic Deep Water current. The continual influx of warm water into the North Atlantic polar ocean keeps the regions around Iceland and southern Greenland mostly free of sea ice year round. The animation also shows another feature of the global ocean circulation: the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The region around latitude 60 south is the the only part of the Earth where the ocean can flow all the way around the world with no land in the way. As a result, both the surface and deep waters flow from west to east around Antarctica. This circumpolar motion links the world's oceans and allows the deep water circulation from the Atlantic to rise in the Indian and Pacific Oceans and the surface circulation to close with the northward flow in the Atlantic. The color on the world's ocean's at the beginning of this animation represents surface water density, with dark regions being most dense and light regions being least dense (see the animation Sea Surface Temperature, Salinity and Density). The depths of the oceans are highly exaggerated to better illustrate the differences between the surface flows and deep water flows. The actual flows in this model are based on current theories of the thermohaline circulation rather than actual data. The thermohaline circulation is a very slow moving current that can be difficult to distinguish from general ocean circulation. Therefore, it is difficult to measure or simulate. This animation first depicts thermohaline surface flows over surface density, and illustrates the sinking of water in the dense ocean near Iceland and Greenland. The surface of the ocean then fades away and the animation pulls back to show the global thermohaline circulation. credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/UMBC source: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?3658
Views: 316267 djxatlanta
Atlantic Ocean Current Drops 15% - Paul Beckwith
 
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Paul Beckwith explains the explains the Arctic melts effects on ocean currents in the Atlantic and what that means for global climate change and sea level rise. Find more at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr546o7ImhGM57qoY0hHvkA https://paulbeckwith.net/
Views: 817 GlobalClimateNews
Ocean Currents
 
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Ocean Currents
Views: 344260 Daniel Izzo
11 months of water flow in the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean (NASA)
 
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Visualization of the marine currents in the Mediterranean during 11 months. From model results constrained with in-situ data. White arrows for surface flow, darker arrows for deeper flow. Original title: Ocean Current Flows around the Mediterranean Sea for UNESCO Credits: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio Access to row video: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a003800/a003820/index.html NASA summary: This visualization shows ocean current flows in the Mediterranean Sea and Western Atlantic. The time period for this visualization is 16 Feb 2005 through 16 January 2006. For each second the passes in the visualization, about 2.75 days pass in the simulation. The colors of the flows represent their depths. The white flows are near the surface while deeper flows are more blue. This visualization was produced using model output from the joint MIT/JPL project: Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II or ECCO2.. ECCO2 uses the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm) to synthesize satellite and in-situ data of the global ocean and sea-ice at resolutions that begin to resolve ocean eddies and other narrow current systems, which transport heat and carbon in the oceans. Animators: Greg Shirah (NASA/GSFC) (Lead) Horace Mitchell (NASA/GSFC) Scientists: Dimitris Menemenlis (NASA/JPL CalTech) Hong Zhang (UCLA) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Deep Ocean Currents | Ocean Currents Part 3
 
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In the deep ocean currents circulate due to varying temperatures and salinities affecting the density of water masses. This is referred to as the thermohaline circulation. The great ocean conveyor belt describes the general circulation pattern of the deep ocean and starts with the North Atlantic Deep Water being formed. The water the moves south towards Antarctica where it meets and moves over top of the Antarctic Bottom Water. These two water masses then move farther south and join an eastward current around the edge of Antarctica. This current breaks into two section one moving into the Indian Ocean and the other into the North Pacific, eventually upwelling. The warm waters then circulate back around the globe, eventually returning to the North Atlantic where the conveyor belt begins. The ocean conveyor belt has an important impact on our climate and the deep water transport of dissolved nutrients Follow us here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ExploreTheAbyss/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/explore.the.abyss/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ExploreTheAbyss The Abyss is an educational video series that explores all aspects of the ocean from weird animal facts to basic oceanographic principles. Join us as we dive in For more information check out the sources used to make this video: Broecker, W.S. 1991. The Great Ocean Conveyor. Oceanography. 4(2). http://imedea.uib-csic.es/master/cambioglobal/Modulo_I_cod101601/clases%20Garcia-Olivares/articulos/Great_Ocean_Conveyor_broecker.pdf Townsend, D.W. 2012. Oceanography and Marine Biology: An introduction to Marine Science. Sinauer Associates, Inc. Sunderland, Massachusets, USA. pp 185-189
Views: 630 The Abyss
NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN || OCEAN CURRENTS || PART - 1
 
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======NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN======= 1. North Equatorial current ----------- Hot current 2. Antelesse current ----------- Hot current 3. Florida current -------------Hot current 4. Gulf Stream -----------Hot current 5. Labrador current -------------- Cold current 6. North Atlantic Drift ------------ Hot current 7. Irminger current -------------- Hot current 8. Norwegian current ---------------Hot current 9. Canary current --------------- Cold current Please Like, Share & Subscribe. =======FACEBOOK======== Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/allconceptsexplained
Views: 414 All Concept Explain
Benjamin Franklin ~ The Gulf Stream & Ocean Currents
 
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Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and in many ways was "the First American". A renowned polymath, Franklin was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, inventor, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. As an inventor, he is known for the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove, among other inventions. He facilitated many civic organizations, including Philadelphia's fire department and a university. The Gulf Stream, together with its northern extension towards Europe, the North Atlantic Drift, is a powerful, warm, and swift Atlantic ocean current that originates at the tip of Florida, and follows the eastern coastlines of the United States and Newfoundland before crossing the Atlantic Ocean. The process of western intensification causes the Gulf Stream to be a northward accelerating current off the east coast of North America. At about 40°0′N 30°0′W, it splits in two, with the northern stream crossing to Northern Europe and the southern stream recirculating off West Africa. The Gulf Stream influences the climate of the east coast of North America from Florida to Newfoundland, and the west coast of Europe. Although there has been recent debate, there is consensus that the climate of Western Europe and Northern Europe is warmer than it would otherwise be due to the North Atlantic drift, one of the branches from the tail of the Gulf Stream. It is part of the North Atlantic Gyre. Its presence has led to the development of strong cyclones of all types, both within the atmosphere and within the ocean. The Gulf Stream is also a significant potential source of renewable power generation.
Views: 4394 Dap Dapple
NASA | The Ocean: A Driving Force for Weather and Climate
 
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The Ocean is essential to life on Earth. Most of Earth's water is stored in the ocean. Although 40 percent of Earth's population lives within, or near coastal regions- the ocean impacts people everywhere. Without the ocean, our planet would be uninhabitable. This animation helps to convey the importance of Earth's oceanic processes as one component of Earth's interrelated systems. This animation uses Earth science data from a variety of sensors on NASA Earth observing satellites to measure physical oceanography parameters such as ocean currents, ocean winds, sea surface height and sea surface temperature. These measurements, in combination with atmospheric measurements such as surface air temperature, precipitation and clouds can help scientists understand the ocean's impact on weather and climate and what this means for life here on Earth. NASA satellites and their unique view from space are helping to unveil the vast... and largely unexplored.... OCEAN. NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information Systems (EOSDIS) EOSDIS is a distributed system of twelve data centers and science investigator processing systems. EOSDIS processes, archives, and distributes data from Earth observing satellites, field campaigns, airborne sensors, and related Earth science programs. These data enable the study of Earth from space to advance scientific understanding. For more information about the data sets used in this animation please visit,http://earthdata.nasa.gov This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: ‪http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11056 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: ‪http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html‬ Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on facebook: ‪http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC‬ Or find us on Twitter: ‪http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard‬
Views: 447160 NASA Goddard
Thermohaline Circulation in Our Oceans [1080p]
 
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The oceans are mostly composed of warm salty water near the surface over cold, less salty water in the ocean depths. These two regions don't mix except in certain special areas. The ocean currents, the movement of the ocean in the surface layer, are driven primarily by the wind. In certain areas near the polar oceans, the colder surface water also gets saltier due to evaporation or sea ice formation. In these regions, the surface water becomes dense enough to sink to the ocean depths. This pumping of surface water into the deep ocean forces the deep water to move horizontally until it can find an area on the world where it can rise back to the surface and close the current loop. This usually occurs in the equatorial ocean, mostly in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. This very large, slow current is called the thermohaline circulation because it is caused by temperature and salinity (haline) variations. This animation shows one of the major regions where this pumping occurs, the North Atlantic Ocean around Greenland, Iceland, and the North Sea. The surface ocean current brings new water to this region from the South Atlantic via the Gulf Stream and the water returns to the South Atlantic via the North Atlantic Deep Water current. The continual influx of warm water into the North Atlantic polar ocean keeps the regions around Iceland and southern Greenland generally free of sea ice year round. The animation also shows another feature of the global ocean circulation: the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The region around latitude 60 south is the only part of the Earth where the ocean can flow all the way around the world with no obstruction by land. As a result, both the surface and deep waters flow from west to east around Antarctica. This circumpolar motion links the world's oceans and allows the deep water circulation from the Atlantic to rise in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, thereby closing the surface circulation with the northward flow in the Atlantic. The color on the world's ocean's at the beginning of this animation represents surface water density, with dark regions being most dense and light regions being least dense (see the animation Sea Surface Temperature, Salinity and Density). The depths of the oceans are highly exaggerated (100x in oceans, 20x on land) to better illustrate the differences between the surface flows and deep water flows. The actual flows in this model are based on current theories of the thermohaline circulation rather than actual data. The thermohaline circulation is a very slow moving current that can be difficult to distinguish from general ocean circulation. Therefore, it is difficult to measure or simulate. credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio source: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?3884
Views: 15100 djxatlanta
Ocean Odyssey - Density Current
 
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Third segment of the Ocean Odyssey describes how the salinity and temperature of water increases its density. The Density Current segment describes how the different densities of water in the ocean create currents.
Views: 155322 NASASciFiles
Ocean Currents याद करें बहुत आसान Trick से👍👍👍
 
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#oceancurrents, #oceancurrentsinhindi, ocean currents map, ocean currents of atlantic ocean, ocean currents of the world, ocean currents meaning in hindi, ocean currents definition, upsc, ocean currents for class 7, ocean currents, ocean currents documentary, ocean, ocean currents map, ocean currents youtube, ocean currents in indian ocean, civil services, geography for upsc, cse geography, #tides, #oceanfloor, tidal force, #tidalrange
Atlantic Ocean Tide
 
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Video of the Atlantic Ocean's strong tide, on a beach in Salvo, North Carolina, on June 7th, 2015 (6-7-15). The video may be somewhat intense (some shaking, loud distorted noise, etc.) for some viewers. Interested in local history? Check out my history website: http://www.historyeveryday.org/home.html
Views: 18391 Matt Nowak
Ocean Circulation: south polar north atlantic
 
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Ocean circulation can be envisaged simply as a system of conveyer belts for large-scale oceanic currents. These are driven by changes in the density of the water mass. The density changes when sunshine, precipitation and evaporation change the temperature and salinity of the water. In addition wind and the tidal forces play important roles. SOURCE: © OZEAN-DER-ZUKUNFT.DE
Views: 6649 FUTUREOCEAN
Ocean Current Flows around the Mediterranean Sea for UNESCO
 
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This visualization shows ocean current flows in the Mediterranean Sea and Eastern Atlantic from 16 Feb 2005 through 16 January 2006. For each second that passes in the visualization, about 2.75 days pass in the simulation. The colors of the flows represent their depths. The white flows are near the surface while deeper flows are more blue. This visualization was produced using model output from the joint MIT/JPL project called Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II or ECCO2. ECCO2 uses the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm) to synthesize satellite and in-situ data of the global ocean and sea-ice at resolutions that begin to resolve ocean eddies and other narrow current systems, which transport heat and carbon in the oceans. Visualizers: Greg Shirah (lead), Horace Mitchell For more information or to download this public domain video, go to https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/3820#11613
Currents Gulf Stream Atlantic
 
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The Sea Level Thematic Center (SL TAC), part of the Copernicus Marine Service is in charge of providing satellite sea surface height and wave observation data. “We then went with the current of the sea's greatest river, which has its own banks, fish, and temperature. I mean the Gulf Stream. It is indeed a river that runs independently through the middle of the Atlantic, its waters never mixing with the ocean's waters. It's a salty river, saltier than the sea surrounding it. Its average depth is 3,000 feet, its average width sixty miles. In certain localities its current moves at a speed of four kilometers per hour. The unchanging volume of its waters is greater than that of all the world's rivers combined.” (Jules Verne, 20,000 leagues under the sea) Our vision of ocean currents is slightly more complex now than in 1869 when Jules Verne published his novel, but some of the above statement still remain true (it was mostly coming from the oceanographer Matthew Maury, who wrote « The Physical Oceanography of the Sea », published 1855). The complexity lies in the turbulence: the ocean currents are not “straight” rivers crossing the seas as might be interpreted from the citation above, but turbulent flows shedding eddies all along their paths. Their observation now is done not only at sea, but also from above: satellites enable to measure the reliefs of the sea surface. These in turn can be used to compute the currents which are turning around the “hills” and “valleys” of this surface. The steeper the slope of the relief, the faster the currents, so that we can map ocean currents any day of the last 25 years over the whole world from observations. Over those 25 years, no less than 12 satellites has been used, with currently 6 of them measuring, enabling to make the most detailed daily maps of ocean surface ever. Copernicus Marine Service is providing such measurements for use in science, forecasts and practical applications. For more information: http://marine.copernicus.eu/sea-level-thematic-center-sl-tac/
Important Ocean Currents
 
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This video explains in detail the importance of ocean currents. This is a product of Mexus Education Pvt. Ltd., an education innovations company based in Mumbai, India. http://www.mexuseducation.com, http://www.ikenstore.in
Views: 159360 Iken Edu
Global Warming's Impact on Ocean Currents to Amplify Sea Level Rise
 
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A new study shows that the Atlantic's currents have weakened due to global warming and are closer to catastrophic collapse than any time in the last 1,600 years, which could cause rapid sea level rise on the East Coast of North America. One of the study's lead authors explains Visit http://therealnews.com for more stories and help support our work by donating at http://therealnews.com/donate.
Views: 7585 The Real News Network
OG- 27 |Ocean current of Pacific and Atlantic Ocean |Mahasagariya Dhara |Hot and cold current |
 
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Oceanography Playlist https://goo.gl/CfAowt Is video me hum prashant aur Atlantic mahasagar ki thandi aur garm jal dharaon ke baare me janenge. Topic Covered 1- Hot and cold current of Atlantic Ocean A- North Atlantic equatorial current -HOT B- South Atlantic Equatorial current -Warm C- Floridan Current - HOT D- Gulf Stream - HOT E- Norwegian Current - HOT F- Labrador Current - COLD G- East Greenland Current - COLD H- Canary Current - Cold and responsible for Sahara Desert I- Brazilian Current - HOT J- Benguelian Current - COLD responsible for Kalahari and Nomib Desert K- Antarctica Drift - Cold L- Falkland Current - Cold responsible for Patagonia Desert Cold and Hot Current of Pacific Ocean A- North Pacific equatorial Current B- Kyuroshio current - Hot C- Alaskan Current - HOT D- Tsushima Current - HOT E- Humboldt or Peruvian Current -HOt
Views: 3708 KV GuruJi
Ocean Currents Disruption: Slower and Wavier
 
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Cutting edge science finds ocean currents slowing down. We all know the equator is warm and poles are cold. This temperature difference causes heat flow from the equator to poles. As the Arctic warms like crazy, heat flow there slows, thus jet streams slow and are wavier; the same slowing and waviness increase happens with ocean currents. If sluggish ocean currents (slowing of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation) halt or redistribute, we are in for a heap of chaotic climate change mayhem. How close are we to shutdown. Stay tuned to my videos and donate to http://paulbeckwith
Views: 12677 Paul Beckwith
North Atlantic Ocean Currents LANL
 
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North Atlantic Ocean Currents from Los Alamos National Labs Shows Ocean Currents with Colors Indicating Ocean Temperature Warmest Ocean Temperatures are Orange and Coldest Are Blue
Views: 25 Arthur Hasler
C8-Ocean currents upsc ias-Gulf Strem,North Atlantic Drift,Bengula,Kuroshio,Oyashio
 
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PDF: https://store.pmfias.com/ Website/notes: http://www.pmfias.com/
Views: 39734 PMF IAS
Ocean currents likely to carry oil to Atlantic
 
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Update: February 28, 2011 - What happened to the oil? Detectable amounts never made it to the Atlantic, at least not in an easily visible form on the ocean surface. In this follow-up article we review: * the difference between a projection and an actual forecast * the challenges of making short-term projections of natural processes that can act chaotically, such as ocean currents. See: http://www2.ucar.edu/currents/what-happened-oil ------ June 3, 2010 A detailed computer modeling study released June 3, 2010, indicates that oil from the massive spill in the Gulf of Mexico might soon extend along thousands of miles of the Atlantic coast and open ocean as early as this summer (see http://www2.ucar.edu/news/ocean-currents-likely-to-carry-oil-spill-to-atlantic-coast ). The modeling results are captured in a series of dramatic animations produced by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and collaborators. The colors represent a dilution factor ranging from red (most concentrated) to beige (most diluted). The simulations do not make any assumptions about the daily rate or total amount of oil spilled and the dilution factor does not attempt to estimate the actual barrels of oil at any spot. Instead, one unit per day of a liquid "dye tracer" is injected in the model at the spill site (injected continuously over the period April 20 through June 20). The animation on this page shows possible scenarios of what might happen to dye released in the upper 65 feet of ocean at the spill site. The dilution factor depicts how dye released at the site of the spill will be progressively diluted as it is transported and mixed by ocean currents. For example, areas showing a dilution factor of 0.01 would have one-hundredth the concentration of oil present at the spill site. The animation is based on a computer model simulation, using a virtual dye, that assumes weather and current conditions similar to those that occur in a typical year. It is one of a set of six scenarios (see http://www2.ucar.edu/news/oil-spill-animations ) that simulate possible pathways the oil might take under a variety of oceanic conditions. Each of the six scenarios shows the same overall movement of oil through the Gulf to the Atlantic and up the East Coast. However, the timing and fine-scale details differ, depending on the details of the ocean currents in the Gulf. (Visualization by Tim Scheitlin and Mary Haley, NCAR; based on model simulations.) A Google Earth visualization was released on June 17, 2010, with a 0.0005 concentration cutoff. The YouTube version is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DS6smLuzBk
Views: 954589 NCAR & UCAR Science
NDA-GS-Geography-Atlantic ocean currents   L 2
 
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NDA-GS-Geography-Atlantic ocean currents L 2
Views: 316 edudoos
World Geography: Ocean currents ( महासागरीय जलधाराएं)
 
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ocean currents in hindi for all Competitive examinations
Views: 126217 NewUTKARS IAS
World faces climate chaos over weak circulation of Atlantic Ocean
 
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There could be weather chaos across Europe, US and Africa as scientists warn circulation of the Atlantic Ocean is at its weakest point in more than 1,600 years. Researchers have found a key cog in the global ocean circulation system has not been running at peak strength since the mid-1800s. If the system continues to weaken, scientists say it could disrupt weather patterns across the world and cause more rapid increase in sea levels on the US East Coast. When it comes to regulating global climate, the circulation of the Atlantic Ocean plays a key role. The constantly moving system of deep-water circulation - sometimes referred to as the Global Ocean Conveyor Belt - sends warm, salty Gulf Stream water to the North Atlantic where it releases heat to the atmosphere and warms Western Europe. The cooler water then sinks to great depths and travels all the way to Antarctica and eventually circulates back up to the Gulf Stream, according to the study published in the journal Nature. However, new research suggests this system has been weakening for centuries. 'Our study provides the first comprehensive analysis of ocean-based sediment records, demonstrating that this weakening of the Atlantic's overturning began near the end of the Little Ice Age, a centuries-long cold period that lasted until about 1850', said study co-author said Dr Delia Oppo, of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Experts believe that as the North Atlantic began to warm near the end of the Little Ice Age, freshwater disrupted the system. Arctic sea ice, and ice sheets and glaciers surrounding the Arctic began to melt. This formed a huge natural tap of fresh water that gushed into the North Atlantic. Researchers say the huge influx of freshwater diluted the surface seawater, making it lighter and less able to sink deep, slowing down the AMOC system. To investigate the Atlantic circulation in the past, scientists first examined the size of sediment grains deposited by the deep-sea currents; the larger the grains, the stronger the current. Then, they used a variety of methods to reconstruct near-surface ocean temperatures in regions where temperature is influenced by AMOC strength. 'Combined, these approaches suggest that the AMOC has weakened over the past 150 years by approximately 15 to 20 per cent', said lead author Dr. David Thornalley, a senior lecturer at University College London. Study co-author Dr Jon Robson, a senior research scientist at Reading University, says the new findings hint at a gap in current global climate models. 'North Atlantic circulation is much more variable than previously thought', he said. 'And it's important to figure out why the models underestimate the AMOC decreases we've observed.' Dr Robson said it could be because the models don't have active ice sheets, or maybe there was more Arctic melting, and thus more freshwater entering the system than currently estimated. Another study in the same issue of Nature, led by scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, looked at climate model data and past sea-surface temperatures. They found the AMOC has been weakening more rapidly since 1950 in response to recent global warming. The AMOC weakening may already have an impact on weather in Europe. 'Model simulations further suggest that an AMOC weakening could become the main cause of future west European summer atmospheric circulation changes, as well as potentially lead to increased storminess in Europe', lead-author Levke Caesar from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research told MailOnline. 'Additionally an AMOC weakening has also been connected to above-average sea-level rise at the U.S. east coast and increasing drought in the Sahel, the latter because the AMOC influences the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. 'With respect to prevention, it would be prudent to rapidly reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide in order to avoid further destabilisation of the climate system', Dr Caesar said. Together, the two new studies provide complementary evidence that the present-day AMOC is exceptionally weak. Dr Thornalley added: 'What is common to the two periods of AMOC weakening - the end of the Little Ice Age and recent decades - is that they were both times of warming and melting. 'Warming and melting are predicted to continue in the future due to continued carbon dioxide emissions.'
Views: 1030 NEWS HEADLINES CN4
What is the Gulf Stream and why is it important?
 
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The Gulf Stream is an Atlantic Ocean current that has a significant impact on the weather and climate of eastern North America and Western Europe. In this Weather Snack we take a quick look at where the Gulf Stream is located and how important a role it plays in dictating the climate we experience today.
Ocean Waves Relaxation 10 Hours | Soothing Waves Crashing on Beach | White Noise for Sleep
 
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Buy Ocean Waves MP3: https://goo.gl/GizkUO You just nabbed the perfect spot at the beach. Put on some sunblock (enough to last ten hours), grab a drink and enjoy the view. Let the crashing waves help you relax. You can play this video when you read, write, study or work to help you maintain focus. Play nature's white noise at night to calm your mind and achieve deep, restful sleep. Whenever you want to create a peaceful ambience, this ocean waves video will do the trick. Filmed at Pupukea Beach at the north shore of O'ahu, Hawaii. © Relaxing White Noise LLC, 2016. All rights reserved. Any reproduction or republication of all or part of this video/audio is prohibited.
Views: 2336943 Relaxing White Noise
Atlantification क्या है? Arctic Ocean is rapidly becoming like Atlantic Ocean, Current Affairs 2019
 
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Views: 15814 Study IQ education
22. Ocean Currents and Productivity
 
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The Atmosphere, the Ocean and Environmental Change (GG 140) Ocean currents are generally divided into two categories: thermohaline currents and wind driven currents. Both types of currents are forced remotely rather than locally. Wind driven currents are initially forced by the wind stress causing water to pile up in certain locations. This produces a pressure gradient, which is then balanced by the Coriolis force and geostrophic currents develop. The gyre circulations found in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are wind driven currents. There is a connection between the physics of these currents and the biological productivity in the ocean. For example, productivity is greatest in areas of equatorial and coastal upwelling as nutrient rich deep water is brought to the sunlit surface. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Ocean Currents 07:37 - Chapter 2. Wind Driven Currents 15:43 - Chapter 3. Transport of Water in Ocean Currents 18:49 - Chapter 4. Atlantic Ocean Circulation 28:06 - Chapter 5. Pacific Ocean Circulation 29:13 - Chapter 6. Southern Ocean Circulation 29:31 - Chapter 7. Arctic Ocean Circulation 31:45 - Chapter 8. Primary Productivity in the Ocean Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2011.
Views: 10112 YaleCourses
Ocean currents transport red tide to Florida's Atlantic coast
 
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The Gulf Stream is one of the major currents along Florida's coastline, which is believed to have picked up red tide and transported it from the Gulf to the Atlantic.
Views: 134 10News WTSP
Great Pacific Garbage Patch - Ocean Pollution Awareness
 
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The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a massive dump of floating garbage in the Pacific Ocean. We contribute to it everyday by littering and using un-biodegradable materials. Our trash is taken downstream from rivers into the ocean, where currents sweep it to the closest patch.
Views: 2531054 oceanpollutionpatch
Meeting of the Mediterranean sea & Atlantic ocean
 
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Video from Farhad Madan
Views: 13460 F Madan
ISLAND OF ATLANTIC OCEAN ,SEA AND GULF OF PACIFIC OCEAN
 
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ISLAND OF ATLANTIC OCEAN , SEA AND GULF OF PACIFIC OCEAN