Home
Search results “Formal style sentences”
How to Use Formal and Informal English - English Speaking and Writing Fluency
 
21:53
In this lesson, you can learn about formal and informal English. You’ll learn how to recognise and use formal and informal styles in your spoken and written English. See the full lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/formal-informal-english Contents: 1. Three Levels of Language 0:47 2. When to Use Formal, Neutral, or Informal Language 3:07 3. Sentence Structure in Formal and Informal English 6:18 4. Formal and Informal English Vocabulary 9:54 5. Directness in Formal and Informal English 13:58 6. Formal and Informal Written English 18:13 In this lesson you can learn: - The three levels of formality: Formal, Neutral, and Informal English. - When you should use formal, neutral, and informal English. - Sentence structure in formal and informal English. - Formal and informal English vocabulary. - Levels of directness in formal and informal English. - How to use formal and informal English in writing. See more free English lessons on our website: http://oxfordonlineenglish.com/
Views: 296800 Oxford Online English
Formal English and informal English
 
04:08
Sometimes formal and informal English can seem like two different languages. Sian's here to show you four features of informal English - and some ways you can make these features more formal. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-19/session-1 Transcript: Hi, Sian here for BBC Learning English. In this Masterclass we're going to look at some differences between formal and informal English. Hey, how's it going? Good afternoon, how are you? Sometimes formal and informal can seem like two different languages. In the same way you wouldn't normally wear shorts and a t-shirt to a job interview, if you use language that's too formal or too informal, you can give a bad impression. Let's look at some differences between formal and informal English. Now, I received an email this morning. Have a look at this email - do you think the language is formal or informal - and why? Dear Mrs Brown, I'm writing to find out whether you have any jobs in your company this summer. At the mo I'm studying Economics at uni. I have been working part-time in a shop and recently they promoted me to the role of manager. I am enthusiastic. I work hard. I pay attention to detail. Ok, so that email used informal language and it's too informal for this style of letter. We're going to look at four features that make this informal and we're going to change it to make it more formal. Number one: choice of vocabulary. In informal English we use more common words and more phrasal verbs. For example here we have a phrasal verb: find out. It would be better to use a more formal equivalent like enquire. Same with jobs, this is quite informal, so instead let's use vacancies here. Instead we have "I'm writing to enquire whether you have any vacancies." Number two. It's more common in informal language to use abbreviations, contractions, shortened forms of verbs. Let's have a look. So, here we have at the mo, which is short for at the moment. This is OK when you're speaking, but not when you're writing. Here, we can use currently which is even more formal. Same here, uni is short for university, so don't use this short form in a letter. "Currently, I am studying Economics at university." Quite often in formal language we choose passive structures over active. Let's have a look here. The active sentences they promoted me is quite informal - it'd be much better to use a passive form here to make it more formal: I was promoted. So, "Recently I was promoted to the role of manager." This doesn't mean don't use active structures in a formal letter, but have a think about whether a passive one is more appropriate. Finally, in informal English, short, simple sentences are much more common. Whereas in formal English, we use more complex sentence structures. Take a look at this one. Here we have three short, simple sentences and this is fine in informal English, but in formal English it's better to use a complex structure. We can do this by adding relative pronouns or linkers. For example, "I am an enthusiastic person who works hard and pays attention to detail. So, would you kindly visit our website... ah, we're friends, that's too formal. Go to our website bbclearningenglish.com for more information about this and to practise formal and informal English. See you soon - goodbye!
Views: 125865 BBC Learning English
American T Sounds: Practice with Business Sentences in a Formal Style
 
03:20
Are you in Seattle? Join our next pronunciation class: https://www.arcos.institute/trainings/english-pronunciation Online Pronunciation course: http://speakmethod.com/750_business_words_main_page.html
Formal vs Informal Writing: What's the Difference and When to Use Them
 
02:53
http://EzineArticles.com/ Before you start writing any article, one of the first things you need to ask yourself is "Who's my audience?" Answering this question will help you decide if you should use a formal writing style or an informal writing style. Watch this video to discover the difference between the two writing styles.
Views: 234217 EzineArticles
Examples of Business Email Writing in English - Writing Skills Practice
 
51:49
Examples of Business Email Writing in English - Writing Skills Practice
Views: 418450 Kendra's Language School
Different ways to say 'Thank you'. - Free English Vocabulary lesson
 
07:40
Different ways to say 'Thank you'. - Free English lesson Why do you say thank you to someone? By using the words 'thank you' is your way of saying you appreciate what they have done. This means you are thanking a person for something they have done or saying for someone else. In this lesson you will learn how to say thank you in different ways with some basic examples of how to use in your sentences. How to use 'thank you' in sentences? There will be times when a simple thank you is not enough the following examples show you how to use in your own sentence's. Thanks. Thanks a lot. Thank you very much. Thank you so much. Thank you kindly. I can't thank you enough. I don't know how to thank you. Thank you for all your help. How to use the above examples in a sentence? Thanks for helping today. Thanks a lot for washing the car. Thank you very much for all your presents. Thank you kindly for lending me some money. I can't thank you enough for all the work you have done for me. Thanks, for helping me when I fell and injured myself, I don't know how to thank you. Thank you for all your help today I wound not have finished painting the room without you. It is best to be polite at all times Remember it is always best to be polite. so if someone helps you in any way it is considered polite to say thank you even if it is just those two words.
English Grammar - Inversion: "Had I known...", "Should you need..."
 
07:38
http://www.engvid.com Should you need help understanding why the subject in this sentence comes after the verb, I can show you. In this English grammar lesson, we will look at sentences in which the subject and verb order is inverted, and the particular situations in which to use them. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-inversion/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about inversion. Now, what does "inversion" mean? "Inversion" is when you change the order of something. Right? So we're looking at grammar. Usually, you know in a sentence a subject comes first and then a verb. Today we're going to look at situations where that is reversed. Now, of course, I'm sure that you know that in questions: "Are you sure?" the verb comes before the subject in all questions. That's what makes a question structure a question structure. However, there are other situations where we have this inversion, but we're looking at a sentence; we're not looking at a question. Now, the thing to understand about inversions is that they are very particular. There are only a few expressions that you're going to use inversion with. You can't put them in just about... In just any sentence that you want. The examples that I've written on the board are the ones that you might read or that you might want to write. There are other situations that use this, but unless you're writing poetry or artistic, creative novels - you don't need them and you don't really need to worry about them either. They're very rare. It's very rare you'll see them. It's very, very formal language style. And you'll recognize them, hopefully, when you do see them. So let's start here. When we have "not only". Generally speaking, when we have a sentence that begins with a negative, we're going to have inversion, but especially when you have "not only", you're going to have inversion. Okay? "Not only did he", so there's your verb, there's your subject, there's your verb. Okay? We have the helping verb, the auxiliary verb to start. "Not only did he win", and then we have the "but", "also" to go with "not only". This is like an expression that's fixed; you're always going to be looking at the same thing. "Not only did he win, but he also broke the record." Whatever. "Not only", inversion, "but also". "Under no circumstances", this is another expression that you'll see regularly. And again, we're looking at the negative construction which is why we're looking at the inversion. "Under no circumstances should you call her/call him." Okay? Whatever you do, don't call. "Under no circumstances". "Circumstances", basically situation. In no situation should you call. In no situation, same idea. Okay? Another negative: "nor". What is "nor"? Is the negative of "or". Okay? "Or", "nor". Again, many people don't use this word anymore; it's a little bit old-fashioned, a little bit high formality level. But... "The mayor of Toronto refused to resign, nor do we expect him to." Okay? So after "nor", we still have the inversion. Verb, subject, verb. Verb, subject. Okay? I'm not sure if you know the mayor of Toronto, he's very famous now. We're not very proud, but that's a whole other story. Next, so these are the three negatives. These two are also very similar. Again, very formal style, but you might see it, you might want to use it in your essays or whatever. "Should you need any help, don't hesitate to call." What does this mean? "Should you need", if you need. "Should" is just a more formal way to say: "if". "If you need any help, don't hesitate to call.", "Should you need any help, don't hesitate to call." Now, this is a verb, subject, verb. If we use: "if", then there's no issue. Then you have "if" which is a conjunction, adverb, clause, conjunction, subject, verb. "Should" makes it verb, subject, verb. "Had" is the same thing with the "if", but a different structure of the conditional, a different "if" structure. "Had I known you were coming, I would have changed." "If I had known", "If I had known you were coming", "Had I known", it's basically you're making the sentence a little bit shorter, a little more formal. You're starting with a verb, a subject, and another verb. Okay? Past perfect, of course. So these are the conditionals, these are the no's. Now, we have the comparatives, when you're comparing something. When you're comparing an action, so you're using the clause marker: "as", not the preposition: "like". So: "John speaks Chinese, as does Lucy." Okay? "Lucy" is actually the subject, here's the verb, here's a subject. Now, I could put a period and put a new sentence. "So does Lucy." Same idea. "Lucy does as well." If I want the subject, verb order. But when you start with "as", you're going to invert the order. This is a clause marker, adverb clause marker to compare.
Common Sentence Endings In Korean - TalkToMeInKorean
 
16:47
Check out our free Korean lessons here: https://talktomeinkorean.com Take a Korean level test and find the right materials for you!: https://www.talktomeinkorean.com/level-test/start In this video lesson, teacher Hyunwoo introduces some sentence endings that you can commonly see Korean people use in day-to-day conversations and explains the meaning in each of them. The sentence endings introduced in this video lesson are: -요 -ㅂ니다 -(으/느)ㄴ 것 같아요 -(으)ㄹ 수도 있어요 -죠 or -지요 -(으/느)ㄴ데요 -네요 -세요 ---------------------------------- 📕 📗 Thanks for watching and studying Korean with our lessons! You can learn even more Korean and get our textbooks on our website at http://talktomeinkorean.com 😃 TTMIK Teacher in this video 👇🏻👇🏻👇🏻 Hyunwoo http://instagram.com/ever4one ---------------------------------- 🇰🇷🇰🇷🇰🇷 Learn how to read and write in Korean https://talktomeinkorean.com/products/detail/18 Our Hangeul books: https://talktomeinkorean.com/products/detail/56 Other social media links http://twitter.com/ttmik http://instagram.com/ttmik http://facebook.com/talktomeinkorean #LearnKorean #KoreanGrammar #KoreanLesson
Views: 524960 Talk To Me In Korean
50 English Conversations for Office Staff
 
33:34
Learn 50 English Conversations for Office Staff
Views: 289557 Boston English Centre
Writing Letters: formal & informal English
 
12:22
A letter to your friend and a cover letter for a job application are written very differently. Whether you work in business or are taking the general IELTS or CELPIP test, knowing the difference between informal and formal writing is a skill you should have. Watch this writing lesson, take our quiz, and check out our resource page to become a better writer. - Use the resource: http://www.engvid.com/english-resource/formal-informal-english/ - Take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/writing-letters-formal-informal-english/ http://www.engvid.com/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello, my name is Emma, and in today's lesson we are going to learn about writing. What kind of writing? Writing letters. Okay? So this is important for people who work in business. It's also important for people who like to write letters to their friends maybe or to their grandparents in English. Also, it is very... It is a very useful video for anyone who is taking the general IELTS test. So if you're taking not academic, but general, this is an important video. And also, if you plan to immigrate to Canada and you want to do the Canadian immigration test which is called: "the CELPIP", this video is also... It will also be useful and helpful to you. Okay? So let's get started. What do I mean by "formal" and "informal"? "Informal" means something you would write to your friends, something you would write to your parents, - well, probably your parents unless you're afraid of your parents, then you might be more formal -, your classmates, your coworkers. Okay? So this is... It means it's not formal; it's for people you know well. On the other hand, "formal" English we use with strangers, we use with our boss, in the workplace, we use it in these different ways. So it's the English you really have to think about, whereas informal is kind of the relaxed English. So relaxed, serious. Okay? So, sometimes you will have to write a letter formally, maybe to your boss or your company, other times maybe you're on holiday and you want to write a letter to your friend, you'll use informal English. So what is the difference? Let's see. Informal English uses contractions. What are contractions? "Didn't", "wouldn't", "couldn't", "haven't", "hasn't". So if you see a verb with an apostrophe and then a "t", that is a contraction. Okay? It's very important to know this because in formal writing, you don't use contractions. "Didn't" would be: "Did not". I can write that for you. "Did not". Couldn't: could not, haven't: have not, can't: cannot. Okay? So that's one major difference. Another major difference between formal and informal writing is the use of idioms; the use of certain expressions. If I'm writing to my friend, maybe I'll say: "Oh, you know, I've been very under the weather lately." Meaning: I've been very sick. If I'm writing to my boss, I won't use idioms. If I'm writing a formal letter, I will not use idioms. Those aren't good to use in formal writing. Phrasal verbs, this is another thing we find in informal writing. What is a phrasal verb? It's a verb that has a preposition. Okay? So, for example: "find out", "find" is a verb, "out" is the preposition. "Go" is the verb, "up" is the preposition. So the... The preposition adds a different meaning to the verb. Phrasal verbs are very difficult to learn; we have so many of them in English. My students have told me phrasal verbs are one of the hardest parts of learning English, but it's possible, you can do it.
Introductions & Greetings - Learn English Conversation
 
13:49
Improve your English conversation skills by learning how to introduce yourself and greet people. Join my complete self-study programme to reach all your English language goals: https://anglo-link.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Enjoy, and subscribe for updates on all our new videos.
Views: 2554721 Anglo-Link
HOW TO WRITE FORMAL LETTER
 
07:04
https://youtu.be/6VMhqOjfvi8..... visit us on our web site www.learnwithafreen.com Email Us [email protected] Formal Letter writing is very easy if you understand the correct format and prepare carefully. In this video of formal letter writing I have explained how to write a complaint letter. Watching this video will give you a clear idea about formal letter writing. https://youtu.be/6VMhqOjfvi8..... How to start a conversation?? https://youtu.be/rUp7XNxGVA0 ESSAY WRITING https://youtu.be/iPNfQULltxc
Views: 1416789 Learn with Afreen
WRITING – Advanced English Transitions: thereby, thereof, hereby, therein, wherein, whereby...
 
15:46
Good writing makes use of transition words, thereby creating better flow and adding some style to the text. In this lesson we'll look at some linking words and transitions used to connect ideas, such as: "thereby", "thereof", "hereby", "therein", "wherein", "whereby", and more. This will make your writing clear and organized. Watch the video to improve your writing style. Now it's time for a lesson on some different transitions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsDR3XEv50E&index=103&list=PLxYD9HaZwsI5C0d8CivHvoI_-0rs8XMfc&t=0s TAKE THE QUIZ ON THIS LESSON: https://www.engvid.com/writing-advanced-english-transitions TRANSCRIPT Hi again, everybody. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's video we're going to look at transitions. Now, you may have seen some other videos on engVid about transitions, especially for writing. What we're going to look at today are a few more specific transitions, but this time we're not looking at transitions between paragraphs or even transitions between sentences. Okay? We're looking at transitions that we are generally using in a sentence to shift from one idea to another idea in a sentence. So they're very similar to, like, adverb... Adverb clauses, for example, but they're used in different ways. But, again, they do have their specific purposes. Now, you'll also notice that all of them or most of them start with: "there" plus a preposition, or "where" plus a preposition, and we have the one special one: "hereby". So: "Thereby", "Thereof", "Thereafter", "Therein", "Therefore", "Wherein", "Whereby", "Hereby", these are the words we're going to look at and how they're used within sentences. Now, before I explain these to you and show them... Show you samples of how they're used, I want you to understand that these are generally very formal, very high-end. They're not very commonly used. There are other ways you can say these things without being too serious, I guess you could say. But if you're going to university, if you're going to take a test, IELTS, TOEFL, SAT, all these tests - you will see these and you should be able to use them as well. And if you can actually use them properly in your essays, and like, again, nicely, appropriately, good timing, your score... That'll help your score. It should go up quite a bit because these are not very easy to use. So, we're going to start with "thereby". "Thereby" basically means by which, or through which, or like through this action something happened. It's a little bit similar to: "due to". The only problem is you can't use it in the same structure as "due to". Okay? So let's look at the first sentence. "The team lost the final game of the season, thereby missing the playoffs." So, basically by doing this, by losing the last game, the result... What happened? They missed the playoffs. But notice that we are using an "ing" here: "...thereby missing the playoffs", right? This is basically a gerund expression, a gerund phrase, but we can't use this with a clause. We're using it with an "ing". So that's one thing you have to keep in mind. If I wanted to use "due to", I would have to change the whole structure. "Due to their loss in the final game of the season, the team missed the playoffs." A completely different structure. I'm using the independent clause, here, the "due to" with the cause, etc. This one gives you another option, basically, on how to link the ideas. Cause, effect. But we don't have to use the "ing", we can use another way. "Lisa studied for three straight weeks and was thereby able to pass her test." So she studied, studied, studied, and through this action she was able to pass her test. And: "...and was thereby", "...and she was thereby able". Notice that I'm not using this to start the clause; I'm using it within the clause, between the verbs to show through this action, this was the result that she was looking for. Okay? So: "by which", "through which action". Let's look at "therein". "The new contract does not allow for extended maternity leave;" here I'm using the semi-colon, I'm going to give you the next idea, so this is like a conjunction. "...therein lies the problem for the union, 60% of whose membership is young women". So, "therein" basically means in that, or into that situation, problem, position, state, etc. So, "therein". "Therein" means: In what? In this situation, in this new contract there's a problem. So: "...therein in this new contract lies a problem", and this is a very common follow-up to the transition "therein". "...therein lies the problem". A very famous expression: "...therein lies the rub" from Shakespeare. "Aye, there's the rub." I'm not sure if you know that expression, I think from Hamlet, dream to... If you dream and you can die, it's all good, but then: Oh, there's a problem - you don't wake up. So: "...therein lies the rub". A very common expression to use with "lies". […]
Writing an email – 18 – English at Work has the words for perfect emails
 
04:04
Anna's having trouble with her emails. She's been trying to sort out the order of Imperial Lemons for Mr Lime. She sends an email but her choice of text-speak isn't appropriate and Paul, the boss, isn't impressed. Anna needs some help from Tom who always has plenty of advice. Her email is rewritten and sent off, but will that be the end of the matter? For more English at Work and other great content:: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Hello, Anna's just arrived at her desk to start the day at Tip Top Trading. Paul is walking towards her, eating a biscuit, he looks a bit bothered. Paul: Anna? Anna: Yes, Paul. Paul: Come and have a biscuit in my office. Now Anna, about Mr Lime. Anna: I didn't say yes! Paul: Pardon? Yes to what? Anna: Oh, nothing. Paul: You sent him an email yesterday and copied me in. Anna: Yes. Paul: Your email reads: boxes ok. pls c-d-u cfirm wnt 300 ta. Anna: Yes: please could you confirm you want 300. Paul: Right. Now that's not really the best way of writing an email to a client, is it? Anna: Oh. Paul: Please could you re-send your message to Mr Lime, using actual words that make sense. Anna: Okay. Paul: Thank you. Have a chocolate crunchy! Anna: Thanks. Tom: Morning Anna. Anna: Hello. Tom: Let me guess, Paul just spoke to you about your email? Anna: How do you know? Tom: You copied me in remember, I just read it – or tried to. Anna: But what's the problem? Other people write like that! Tom: No, maybe some people write text messages like that in an SMS message on their phones, but that is completely the wrong style for an email to a client. Narrator: Okay Anna, let's stop listening to Tom, he's a waste of space. These are the kinds of phrases you need in a business-related email: Dear Mr Lime... I hope you are well. I am writing regarding... Please could you confirm... Yours sincerely, or Best wishes. Anna: Thank you! I'll rewrite my message. There! I'd better get it checked before I send. Denise? Denise: (On the phone) yes... the other problem with Stephanie is that her legs are just too long... Anna: Oh, she's on the phone. Denise: ... yes, like trees... Anna: I'll have to ask Tom. Tom? Tom: Mm? Anna: Could you read this through before I send it? Tom: Hang on, Anna, let me just finish this sentence. It’s really important. I’m ready, let’s have a look. Okay. (reading) Dear Mr Lime, I hope you are well. I am writing regarding your request for luxury boxes for the Imperial Lemon Delivery. We will indeed be able to supply them. Please could you confirm that you want 300. Best wishes, Anna. Anna: Well? Tom: It’s good, it's much better. Send it. Hopefully Mr Lime will think your last message was just someone sitting on your keyboard by mistake. Anna: Thanks. Tom: You're not... Anna: What? Tom: Nothing. It's none of my business. Anna: What? Tom: You're not ever going to go to lunch with Mr Lime are you? I mean, in a non-business way... Anna: No of course not! Tom: I mean I don’t care… it's just... important to... stay professional. Anna: Yes. Narrator: Hmmm.... well, I had a feeling Anna's email was going to cause problems. But at least she won't make a mistake like that again. Here’s a reminder of the phrases she used in her new, improved email. Dear Mr Lime... I hope you are well. I am writing regarding... Please could you confirm... Best wishes. Until next time, bye!
Views: 139501 BBC Learning English
Topic Sentences and Outlines
 
07:12
This video discusses developing topic sentences that support a thesis and then integrating these into a formal outline. Use these techniques for writing a literary analysis argument style research paper.
Syntax - The Formal Analysis of Sentences (VLC Series #4)
 
04:41
In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the formal analysis of a sentences: First, in terms of its simple and phrasal categories and then by looking at the clausal structure.
How to Be More Polite in English: Useful Phrases for Speaking Polite English
 
14:03
Polite Expressions in English: https://7esl.com/speaking-polite-english/ Learn How to Be More Polite in English, Useful Phrases for Speaking Polite English. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- WATCH MORE: ★ Grammar: https://goo.gl/7n226T ★ Vocabulary: https://goo.gl/E5Ty4T ★ Expressions: https://goo.gl/JBpgCF ★ Phrasal Verbs: https://goo.gl/Ux3fip ★ Idioms: https://goo.gl/y7wNjN ★ Conversations: https://goo.gl/pmdpQT ★ Kids Vocabulary: https://goo.gl/Xr3G68 ★ English Writing: https://goo.gl/46gmY7 ★ IELTS: https://goo.gl/Tg2U4v ★ TOEFL: https://goo.gl/8Zwvic ★ British vs. American English: https://goo.gl/VHa5W8 ★ Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/P4eR39 ★ Business English: https://goo.gl/r7jqtB ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- OUR SOCIAL MEDIA: Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/7english/ Facebook: https://www.fb.com/7ESLLearningEnglish/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/7ESL1 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and lessons visit: https://7esl.com/
Views: 359599 7 E S L
Useful English greetings and responses -- Free English Lesson
 
07:34
Useful English greetings and responses -- Free English Lesson You probably already know "hello" and "how are you?" However, English speakers don't always say "hello" and "how are you?" and answer I am fine. They also use many other English greetings and expressions to say slightly different things. Let's learn how to use some other simple formal and informal English greetings, as well as fun slang expressions that people around the world use to greet each other and their responses to it. How are you? Hey how's it going? Fine. This is a simple, straight answer. If you don't say anything else, though, it might be a signal that you don't want to continue the conversation. Not bad. This is a more friendly -sounding answer than "fine". Fine, thanks. This answer is formal. You might answer this way if someone you don't know, like a waiter at a restaurant, asks how you are. Very well, thanks. Pretty good. If you don't care as much about grammar, you can answer "Good" or "Pretty good". It's more common and casual. Great! How are you doing? This is an enthusiastic, excited response. It's always s good to ask a question back to the other person if you want to continue the conversation. I'm hanging in there. This answer makes it sound like you're having a tough day. I've been better. People usually give positive answers to the question "How are you?" If you give a negative answer like this one, it usually means that you want to tell the listener your sad story. So they'll usually ask what's wrong. What's up? What's new? What's happening? This question means "What's happening in your life?" But you don't have to answer honestly. If you don't want to start a long conversation, you can use one of these standard replies: 1) Nothing much. This is the most common answer. You can follow it by sharing something interesting that's happening: "Nothing much. Just getting ready for Vanessa's graduation." 2) Oh, just the usual. Answer this way if you do mostly the same things each day. 3) Oh gosh, all kinds of stuff ! You can answer this way if your life has been really busy and exciting lately. What's happening? This question means the same thing as "What's up" and can be answered in the same way. There certain slangs that are used by many people to greet each other such as : 1) Yo! 2) Howdy! And the response to it can be any of the above or 'Alright mate'.
English lesson to reduce redundancy and improve English speaking style.
 
12:41
Do you sound wordy in English? English lesson to avoid redundancy (Learning to speak Fluent English) Blog : http://www.learnex.in/do-you-sound-wordy-in-english-english-lesson-to-avoid-redundancy In this English lesson you will learn how to be less wordy in English and reduce redundancy in English, further improving you English speaking style. In sentences extra phrases, which do not add value or meaning to the sentence are considered redundant. They not only make it lengthy,but give room for grammatical errors. Website : http://www.letstalkpodcast.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/letstalkpodcast 1) Point in time: that/this time, moment 2) Basically: (You don’t necessarily need it) 3) Years’ time: Grammatical error. Correct phrase is‘in few years’ 4) Previous experience: Experience is referred to previous instances; we don’t need previous + experience 5) Roughly about: approximately 6) Whether or not: if 7) The reason why: the reason is/ Because 8) Very unique: Drop the word Very 9) Length and breadth of a period: During or through out 10) The very moment: ‘Very’ is redundant
Combining Sentences (Part 2)
 
03:54
Watch Shaun's Smrt Live Class live for free on YouTube every Thursday at 17 00 GMT (17 00 GMT = https://goo.gl/cVKe0m). Become a Premium Subscriber: http://www.smrt.me/smrt/live Premium Subscribers receive: - Two 1-hour lessons per week with a Canadian or American teacher - Video-marked homework & assignments - Quizzes & exams - Official Smrt English Certification - Weekly group video chats This video is on the different kinds of sentences in English; we will discuss how to combine our ideas to vary the length and style of our sentences to make our writing more interesting and clear. Join the Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/leofgroup If you would like to support the stream, you can donate here: https://goo.gl/eUCz92 Exercise: http://smrtvideolessons.com/2013/07/26/combining-sentences-part-1/ Learn English with Shaun at the Canadian College of English Language! http://www.canada-english.com
Views: 64541 Smrt English
5 Idioms to Use in Your IELTS TOEFL Essay
 
08:53
Idioms add natural style to your English writing. If used correctly, they can make your essay more interesting and engaging. These 5 idioms are useful when looking at two sides of a thing, a choice, a decision, and so on. These are especially good for advantages vs disadvantages type questions, compare, agree/disagree, and others. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 631952 Write to Top
How to Write a  Formal Letter
 
12:14
Need to write a formal letter for the IELTS general test, task 1? Maybe you just need to write emails for business or other purposes. In this video, we look at the basic structure and content of a formal letter. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 286108 Write to Top
12 Common Errors in Academic English – and how to fix them!
 
07:44
What's "academic writing"? If you're in school or university, you must know the difference between general English and academic English. Watch this important lesson to avoid the most common mistakes students make in academic writing. In your own language, the difference between these two modes of writing might not be that great, but in English, there are a lot of differences depending on the context. So even if you know your grammar and write a correct sentence, you might still be wrong because the structure or tone was not appropriate for an academic setting! Watch this video and learn how to write correctly and get higher grades in an academic environment. Then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/12-common-errors-in-academic-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca. And in today's lesson, I'll explain twelve common errors that students make in academic English. Now, what's academic English? It's the English that you need to use in school, college, or university when you're reading, writing, listening, and speaking -- okay -- ideally, but most importantly, when you're writing. Now, what's the difference between academic English and general English? Well, academic English in general -- there are many differences, but in general, academic English is more formal; it's more objective, and also, it has to use a lot of referencing. You always have to let people know where you got your information from. You have to cite the source. You have to give the source. You can't claim to write something and claim it as your own. Okay? If you do that, that's called "plagiarism". It's a very serious offense in academic circles. But today, we're not going to talk about how to reference a source. We're going to talk about the two other aspects: How to write more formally and objectively, and what are the ten common errors that students make when they are not formal enough. Okay? So not ten, twelve. Here we go. So first of all, using contractions. All of these are what you should not do, okay? So avoid using contractions. Sorry. In this case, don't use contractions at all. So don't say "don't"; say "do not". Don't say "isn't"; say "is not". All right? That's academic English. Next, avoid phrasal verbs. So for example, instead of saying "go up" -- "Prices went up. -- say, "Prices increased." Instead of saying "take away", say "removed". Avoid these multi-part verbs. All right? It's not as formal. Next, avoid idioms. Instead of saying, "It was A1", say, "It was excellent." All right? Avoid slang. Don't say "kids"; say "children". Use the proper terminology for various subjects. Avoid pronouns. So for example, instead of saying, "You can see from the graph..." -- all right. We use the pronoun "you". Instead of that, say, "The graph shows..." all right? Next, avoid negatives. For example, instead of saying, "Something is not effective", just say, "It is ineffective." Instead of saying something is "not positive", say, "It's negative." So avoid these kinds of negatives. Next, avoid clichés. Now, what are "clichés"? "Clichés" are a kind of idiom, basically -- commonly used expressions. All right? And so on. Kind of a common wisdom about different things. And so you want to avoid these kinds of expressions. For example, instead of saying, "When all is said and done" -- all right? We use that in conversation, but you don't want to use it in your academic writing. Instead of saying that, you'd probably use an expression like "in conclusion". All right? So next, there are certain kinds of punctuation -- there are actually lots of rules about punctuation. And the kind of punctuation, the style of punctuation that you use in academic writing depends on the style guide that you have been asked to follow in your school, college, or university. Some very well-known style guides are the MLA or APA. These are certain style guides, and they tell you everything about how you need to write, what rules you need to follow, what are the rules of punctuation and of quotations marks, of this and that. Okay? A lot more than what I'm covering here. But in general, I can just tell you that we don't see that many exclamation marks in academic writing, okay? We do see a lot of semicolons. All right? That's kind of -- when do we use a semicolon? Do you remember? Okay. What's the difference between a period and a semicolon? A period clearly divides two sentences. And a semicolon has one sentence which is a complete sentence; then you put the semicolon. You do not capitalize the next letter, and the next sentence is connected, and you want to show that it's connected to the first sentence, which is a very academic, intellectual, philosophical thing to do. So learn to use semicolons if you're in university especially.
How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson
 
14:16
✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI 👉 Check the latest Video - American Idioms I love to use the most? How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson I will share easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. • Avoid using contractions – Do not use contractions while constructing your sentences, esp. if you are writing a business email or formal letters i.e. words like don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, isn’t, haven’t should be avoided. • Avoid there are/ there is – It will make your sentence more lengthy and boring to read. e.g There are many problems in her class (incorrect) Her class is facing many problems. (Correct) There is an exhibition at the hotel. (Incorrect) The hotel is holding an exhibition. (Correct) • Avoid using unnecessary words in your sentences like very; really, a lot instead use better vocabulary. It will definitely not change the meaning of your sentence but will make it sound interesting. Students think literature is very hard. Students think literature is difficult. • Make use of strong verbs – It will make your sentence sound more appropriate and concrete. He gave assistance to my friend. (weak verb) My friend assisted him. (Strong verb)
What your speaking style, like, says about you | Vera Regan | TEDxDublin
 
15:47
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. How we use language - our accent, expressions, and the structure of our sentences - changes from region to region. Vera Regan explains why we should listen to these differences, and why language can act as a cultural barometer. Sociolinguist Vera Regan is a researcher at University College Dublin, and her work explores the relationship between our cultural landscape and our changing language. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 3158862 TEDx Talks
English Grammar (Advanced) — Inversion
 
17:00
Not only do inverted sentences give your writing some style, they also get you higher points on the IELTS or TOEFL essay score. In this video we look at another complex sentence structure that you can add to your toolbox for better English writing. In inverted clauses (such as the one above) the verb comes before the subject. This structure is very formal and is not limited to clauses beginning with NOT ONLY. There are many examples of inversions, such as: Hardly had she arrived… Should you feel inclined to… Neither do you. And many more. There is a lot to take in in this lesson, but recognizing these structures will not only make your writing better, it will help your reading as well (notice that not only in the last sentence does not lead to an inversion—find out why in the video). Don’t forget to visit https://www.writetotop.com for more of our original content. See our Idea Banks (full of useful vocab): http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Would you like to help make Write to the Top even better? Support us: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 10024 Write to Top
IELTS TOEFL Essay Writing - How to Achieve Sentence Variety
 
24:33
Good writing, and a high score on the IELTS and TOEFL exams’ writing section, requires sentence variety. In this lesson, we look at the four sentence types as one tool to vary your sentences, and we also look at other elements of the language, such as modifiers, different phrases, linking words, etc. to make each sentence type more elaborate. Get the tools to make your writing more engaging and sophisticated. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 64185 Write to Top
Attending a Meeting in English - Useful Phrases for Meetings - Business English
 
14:04
Imagine that you have a business meeting to attend tomorrow. If the meeting is in English, will you be ready? This lesson will help you learn useful phrases to introduce yourself, respond to suggestions and ideas, and ask questions in an English meeting. See the full version of this free English lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/english-meetings Contents: 1. How to Introduce Yourself 0:43 2. Making, Accepting and Rejecting Suggestions 4:19 3. Asking Questions 7:46 4. Making Promises and Offers 11:02 This lesson will help you learn: - Formal and informal ways to introduce yourself in a business meeting. - Ways to make suggestions in an English business meeting. - Phrases to accept suggestions in an English business meeting. - How to reject other suggestions in an English business meeting. - Phrases to politely ask questions in a meeting. - How to make a promise during a business meeting. - How to make an offer during a business meeting. See more of our free English lessons here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/
Views: 309721 Oxford Online English
What to say at your job interview (all my BEST phrases and tips!)
 
22:48
All my best advice on what to say at your job interview. I will tell you how to answer the most common job interview questions. I’ll give you the grammatical structures to use when answering questions about your work experience, and also share with you vocabulary and phrases that will impress your interviewer. I recommend you prepare for your job interview by learning phrases you can repeat in your interview and also by practising your answers to these common questions. Get a friend to ask you the questions and make sure that you answer them in English! You can follow my advice about how to answer job interview questions whether you are looking for a job in an English-speaking country or you are being interviewed in English for a job in your home country. Good luck with your interview – I wish you success! If you want more help, watch my video on how to write your CV. Remember: there is no 'try'! Once you've finished the lesson, take the quiz here: http:/www.engvid.com/what-to-say-at-your-job-interview TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're talking about today is job interview English. So, in this lesson, I'm going to give you some phrases that you can use in a job interview, and I'll also be giving you... We'll also be looking at what grammar you should be using to answer common job interview questions. So I'm going to break it down so you know what to expect when you have that job interview in English, maybe for the first time, or maybe you've already had a couple of interviews in English but you just want to improve your performance. So let's start by talking about before the interview. So when you get there, there's always, like, that bit of small talk. Maybe you find it awkward, maybe you're a pro at small talk, but I thought I'd just give you some phrases so that you've got something to say, at least. So, when you get there, it's polite to say something like: "Thanks for inviting me to interview." If you feel like initiating small talk, you could say something like: "Is the position based in this office?" or "building", wherever you are. You might also want to say: "Oh, how many people work here?" Just sort of general things, nothing personal going on there. Or you might make an observation about what you see about the building or the workplace. You could say: "The offices are impressive." Now, clearly, if the building isn't very nice, and there isn't anything remarkable about it, then I probably wouldn't say something like this. It's better to make no observation than say one that's not true, or one that sounds a bit strange because the place is a real dump. You don't want to say it's great in your phrase. But maybe the area's nice, so then you could say: "What a great location!" This is an exclamation. You say it with some kind of enthusiasm. Or you might say, as you're walking to the interview room: "Ah, I see you have an open plan office." That means where everybody works together in the same room. Or you might say: "I see you have a staff canteen." That's where you get your food. Okay? So, all suggestions for general small talk. The interviewer may, however, initiate small talk with you, in which case, general things they like to talk about in England... Our... Our favourite topics of small talk are the weather, so you could say something like: "It's chilly today." That means it's a bit cold. Or mild. "Mild" is... "Mild" is when the weather is better than you would expect for that time of year. So if it's winter and it's mild, it's not as cold as you would expect it to be. Yep. So we love to talk about the weather, you know that about British people. Did you also know we like to talk about the traffic or the tube delays and things like that? So, perhaps they'll say: "How was the traffic? How was your journey here?" You can tell them about your journey. Say: -"Oh, it wasn't bad." -"How was your journey?" -"Not bad." That means it was okay. Or you could say: "It didn't take me too long." It didn't take me too long. Now, just a tip: You don't want to say: "It was a nightmare; it took me hours", because they'll probably want to employ someone who can get to the job easily.
Presentations in English - How to Give a Presentation - Business English
 
16:46
In this lesson, you can learn how to make presentations in English. Do you have to make presentations in English in your job? Imagine you have to give an important presentation in English tomorrow. How would you feel about it? This lesson will help you learn useful phrases and techniques to introduce yourself and your topic, keep your ideas organised, deal with problems, and respond to questions from audience members. See the full version of this lesson with text: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/presentations-in-english. This lesson will help you: - Learn how to begin the presentation by introducing yourself and the topic. - Understand how to make a strong start to your presentation in English. - Use signposting language throughout your presentation. - Learn how to deal with potential problems that occur in presentations in English. Contents: 1. How to introduce yourself and your topic 0:45 2. How to make a strong start 3:51 3. Using signposting language 7:33 4. Dealing with problems 12:04 See more free lessons like this on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 429259 Oxford Online English
How to Paraphrase
 
13:50
Good writing needs variety and style. One way to do this is by paraphrasing so that we avoid using the same words and sentences. This lesson goes over the basics of strong paraphrasing, especially for those who need to take the IELTS or TOEFL exams. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 133858 Write to Top
Writing is Painless 1: Sentence Structure
 
14:58
Sentence structure is the basic building block for writing an effective academic essay. Learning the four sentence types isn't difficult; it just takes time and practice.
Views: 102390 Saundra Rinehart
Paraphrasing:  The Basic Steps
 
11:27
It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
Views: 554104 DiveIn Learning
25 Academic English Words You Should Know | Great for University, IELTS, and TOEFL
 
16:15
ABOUT THE LESSON 📚 Why should you learn academic words? There are many reasons - school, work, English exams. Academic English is important because it enhances our overall fluency by allowing us to be more descriptive and precise when presenting information at work or even writing a university paper. The words in this lesson were taken from the Academic Word List. This is a list of the most common academic words used in English. For an entire list of these words here: https://www.examenglish.com/vocabulary/academic_wordlist.html #AcademicWords #IELTS #TOEFL -------------------------- SECRET FLUENCY LESSON 👉 http://bit.ly/Secret_Lesson BECOME A PATRON 👉 http://bit.ly/Patreon_InteractiveEnglish -------------------------- LINKS TO PRACTICE & IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH ✅ Improve Your Listening w/ Audiobooks. FREE TRAIL! http://www.audibletrial.com/InteractiveEnglish Find an English Teacher/Tutor (Recommended Sites) 🙋 italki: http://bit.ly/Italki_InteractiveEnglish Verbling: http://bit.ly/Verbling_InteractiveEnglish Eliminate Writing Mistakes ✍ Grammarly: http://bit.ly/Grammarly_InteractiveEnglish Wes’ Teaching Adventures Happy Time Go Fast (South Korea): http://amzn.to/2FmYhSS Watermelon Is Life (Namibia): http://amzn.to/2FEjE1j **Please know that links to Audible, italki, Lingoda, Verbling, Grammarly are affiliate links. We earn commission through these links. -------------------------- FOLLOW INTERACTIVE ENGLISH 👍 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InteractiveEng/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/interactiveeng/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/interactiveeng -------------------------- OTHER SHOUT-OUTS 💬 Royalty-free images provided by Pixabay Music: Life of Riley by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400054 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ -------------------------- MESSAGE TO YOU 😊 Thanks so much for being a part of our community. Learning English is an enriching experience that brings everyone all around the world closer together. Be sure to say “Hello” and write to us in the comments. We love hearing from all of you. THANKS FOR WATCHING!
Views: 572602 Interactive English
MLA Style Essay Format - Word Tutorial
 
10:01
MLA style essay formatting: margins, font, line spacing, header, info block, title, indentation, block quote, Works Cited. For a transcript of this video, please see http://polaris.umuc.edu/ewc/web/mla7.html
Views: 1550740 David Taylor
Speaking English - How to answer the phone
 
09:33
http://www.engvid.com/ Practice speaking on the phone with me, Emma! Do you know how to speak on the phone? Do you feel nervous talking on the phone? In this survival English video, I teach you common expressions to use on a phone call. By learning these expressions, your telephone conversations will become clearer and you will understand more. You can practice these expressions by taking our quiz. http://www.engvid.com/speaking-english-how-to-answer-the-phone/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma. And in today's lesson, we are going to be learning some important telephone expressions. Okay? I know a lot of students get very scared when they have to talk on the phone, and it's understandable; it can be very scary when you can't see the person's face when you're talking to them. So one great idea if you're afraid of talking on the phone in English is to memorize key expressions that we use all the time. This way, it will improve your listening, you will know what people will probably say on the phone, and your speaking will improve too. All right? Now, in this video, we're actually going to practice these expressions together. In my pocket, I have my cellphone. All right? So what is going to happen is I will teach you an expression, and then I will pretend to be on the phone, you can pretend to be on the phone too. I will say something, and you say the correct expression to me. All right? So, if you don't understand, that's okay - you will in a moment. Let's get started. Now, when somebody calls you... "Ring, ring, ring, ring" First thing you say is: "Hello?" As in a question. "Hello?" All right? And then what happens? The person who's calling asks a question. They can do this in different ways. I've listed four different ways, the most common. Sometimes they'll say: "Is __________ there, please?" "Is Emma there, please?", "Is Daniella there, please?" "Is Yvonne there, please?" Okay? A very common way. And notice: "please", very important to be polite. You can also say: "This is __________" - Emma - "calling for _________." Whoever you're calling. So, if I'm calling you, I might say: "Oh, hello. This is Emma calling for Daniel", "This is Emma calling for Joseph.", "This is Emma calling for Pete." Okay? So this is a common expression, especially if you're at work, this is the one we would use a lot at work. This one is a little more informal; you'd probably use this one more if you're calling your friends or calling someone in not a business situation. This is also another informal one: "Is __________ in?" So all of these blanks are the name of the person who the caller wants to speak to. "Is Emma in?", "Is John in?", "Is Mary in?" Okay. So, again: "Hello. Is Mary in?" Informal. Last one: "May I please speak to __________?" Emma. "May I please speak to Mary?", "May I please speak to the doctor?" All right? This one is more formal. So we have sort of formal/informal, formal, informal, and last one, formal. All right, so let's get your phone out. All right? Whether you have a real cellphone or your hand, and let's practice a statement. So you're going to be calling me. You're going to use one of these expressions. Pick whichever one you want and practice it. All right? Let's get started. "Ring, ring, ring, ring." "Hello?" Perfect. All right? So you can watch this video again and again; practice, practice, practice until you have it memorized, until it is easy for you. All right, now how do I respond or how..? How does the person you're calling respond? If you say: "Is Emma there, please?" I would say: "Speaking." Which means: "Yes, it's me, it's Emma." I wouldn't say that, I would just say: "Speaking." Or I could say: "__________ speaking. How can I help you?" [SM1]"Emma speaking.", "Emma speaking. How can I help you?" "This is __________." [SM2]"This is Emma." Or: "This is he.", "This is she." All right? So again, these represents the... The name of the person. This... These blanks are names. All right? So let's try one. I want you to pick any of these. All right? Now, I'm sorry - there are so many of you, I probably will not pick your name when I ask this question. So today, I am going to call you all "Bob". I'm sorry if that's a problem, but today, you are Bob. All right? So I want you to either say: "Speaking.", "Bob speaking.", "This is Bob." Just for practice. All right. So get your phone ready. "Ring, ring, ring, ring" So you say: "Hello?" And I say: "Is Bob there, please?" What do you say? Good, very good. All right, so let's learn some more expressions. Okay, great. So we've gone through the first part of a phone call. - "Hello, is Emma there, please?" -"Speaking." All right? Now what? What if someone calls you and you pick up, but they're not looking for you; they're looking for your brother, they're looking for your mother, they're looking for someone else - what do you say?
5 tips to improve your writing
 
12:13
Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
Paragraph Structure
 
04:27
Watch Shaun's Smrt Live Class live for free on YouTube every Thursday at 17 00 GMT (17 00 GMT = https://goo.gl/cVKe0m). Become a Premium Subscriber: http://www.smrt.me/smrt/live Premium Subscribers receive: - Two 1-hour lessons per week with a Canadian or American teacher - Video-marked homework & assignments - Quizzes & exams - Official Smrt English Certification - Weekly group video chats In this video, we will discuss the structure and organization of a standard paragraph, as well as the importance of the topic sentence. After the video, students will have an understanding of paragraph structure and be able to write a strong topic sentence. Join the Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/leofgroup If you would like to support the stream, you can donate here: https://goo.gl/eUCz92 Exercise: http://smrtvideolessons.com/2013/03/16/paragraph-structure/ Learn English with Shaun at the Canadian College of English Language! http://www.canada-english.com
Views: 412206 Smrt English
How to write a hook
 
08:59
Learn how to write a hook (attention-getting intro) for an essay. Video includes 5 kinds of hooks: inverted pyramid, fact/statistic, anecdote/personal experience, rhetorical question, and bold pronouncement. Also included are 3 hooks to avoid. Twitter @mistersato411
Views: 701742 mistersato411
Writing Skills: The Paragraph
 
14:33
The paragraph is the most important unit of a well-written essay. The paragraph has a specific structure and standards that make it effective and enjoyable to read. In this writing lesson we will look at how to construct good paragraphs and improve writing with better flow and clarity. After the lesson, take the quiz: https://www.engvid.com/writing-skills-paragraph/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about the paragraph. It's a writing lesson, and I want to show people what a paragraph is and how to construct one, what to do, what not to do so you can write very clear, very tight paragraphs. This is especially important for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students but everybody has to follow the exact same rules. Now before I even begin, I must say that I'm talking mostly about academic writing or even business writing. Creative writing like novels or short stories, anything fiction, you can do anything you want. Only always remember: somebody has to read what you wrote so it has to be clear. But academic essays, for example, certain rules you have to follow; you have to be very careful about them. So let's begin. In terms of like the actual way a paragraph looks: you have to indent or skip a line. So let me just make sure you understand what an indent is. This is an indent, the first line a little bit pushed in or you can make sure you skip a line between paragraphs. But don't do both. If you skip a line, don't indent. Okay? That's the main thing. Now, that's in terms of the way it looks. In terms of content -- and this, I can't stress this enough -- very, very, very important: one central idea in one paragraph. Okay? I've seen many people, I've seen many essays where you start a paragraph talking about one thing, and then you go off on a tangent and talk about something completely unrelated. So for example: if you start a paragraph and you're talking about apples, continue to talk about apples. If you go to oranges, that's maybe okay because you're still talking about fruit. But if you start with apples, go to oranges, go to bananas, and then end up with monkeys in space there's a bit of a problem; the reader has no idea what you're talking about. One paragraph, one central idea. Now, make sure that you tell the reader what this central idea is. This is your thesis statement. Okay? It's a very general sentence. All it does is introduce the topic of the paragraph, nothing else. All the details comes after. So speaking of details, we'll talk about details in detail, but all other ideas, all the other sentences, all your sentences with the details must directly relate back to the main idea. So let's say here is your thesis statement; very general, every sentence after must relate back to that thesis statement. Okay? You can't go off to another idea. Everything must support this, must talk about the same topic. Very important. Okay? How long should your paragraph be? Technically, a paragraph could be one sentence, but in an academic essay that rarely happens. But it could be any length you want, as long as you're still on that one topic, as long as you still have things to write and things to say about that topic, say it. If you have four sentences, fine; if you have 10 sentences, also okay. Again, for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students: four, five sentences should be your limit. You can't be too long because you don't have time and you're going to start making mistakes. So now, the details. Very important to have lots of details. Why is this topic important to your overall idea of your essay? Not only tell me what is the topic, what is the thesis statement of the paragraph, make sure you explain to me why this is important to the general idea of the essay. Give me your reasons. Now, why is it important? And then reasons, why you think what you're saying supports this idea. Examples, always use examples because giving me the reasons is okay; examples make me see exactly what you're trying to say. Very easy for me to understand what you're trying to say. Now, in terms of flow, in terms of the way the reader can approach the paragraph, you have to have bridges. What is, what do bridges mean? Basically, when you have one idea in this sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence. Every sentence must have a link to the next sentence. This creates flow, makes it much easier to read and understand, and it keeps you on the one topic. Now, key terms. If you're talking about something specific and you have to use a key term, use it as many times as you need to. Otherwise, avoid repetition. Try not to use the same word more than once in one paragraph. Okay? For example: if you're using the word "moreover" in the paragraph, don't use it, don't use "moreover" again -- use "in addition to", use "furthermore", "another", etc. Try to avoid using one word more than once, especially in the same paragraph.
English में Hello केहने के SMART तरीके – Greetings in English – Speaking practice lesson in Hindi
 
14:47
English में Hello केहने के SMART तरीके – Greetings in English – English speaking practice lesson in Hindi Saying Hello is very common when you greet someone. We meet people in different social situations formally and informally, so why just say hello? Learn different ways to greet someone in English. In this English speaking lesson in Hindi with your favourite teacher Michelle, you will learn to say Hello in different situations, such as formal greetings, informal greetings, slang greetings, greeting close friends etc. Improve your #English #fluency with our free English speaking practice lessons in Hindi. Like us on #Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/learnexone For practice Sentences from this lesson visit - http://www.hindi.learnex.in/formal-and-informal-greetings-in-english-speaking-lesson-hindi Watch previous #Englishlessons - Got के 08 अलग मतलब | 60 Spoken English Sentences. http://www.hindi.learnex.in/using-got-free-english-speaking-classes/ अपनी life को बनाओ Ordinary से Extraordinary http://www.hindi.learnex.in/personality-development-video-in-hindi-extraordinary-life/ How to use WOULD, COULD & SHOULD? http://www.hindi.learnex.in/how-to-use-would-could-should-english-speaking-institute-in-mumbai/ Learn English Proverbs – मुहावरे और कहावते http://www.hindi.learnex.in/learn-english-proverbs/
4 Writing Tips |Four Ways to Start Your Sentences | How to Write Interesting Sentences
 
05:27
4 Writing Tips |Four Ways to Start Your Sentences | How to Write Interesting Sentences! Have you ever heard or read a story that kept you on the edge of your seat? Chances are the sentence beginnings helped hold your attention. Instead of starting every sentence with a subject and a verb, the storyteller probably began some sentences with attention-grabbing words, phrases and clauses. Varied sentence beginnings do more than hold a reader's attention. They also improve the overall style of writing. The examples in this video will show you How to Begin Your Sentences with introductory words, phrases, and clauses. NOTE: When you vary sentence beginnings, you sometimes must reword the sentences for clarity. As you reword, be sure to place modifiers close to the words they modify; otherwise, you may create a misplaced modifier. STYLE/TIP: In your reading, you will frequently see coordinating conjunctions used to begin sentences. Because such usage is often considered informal, it is best not to use coordinating conjunctions to begin your sentences in formal, or academic, situations. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. #writing #english #education #sentences #teaching
4 Writing Tips | Interesting Ways to Start Your Sentences:  Part 2
 
07:41
Have you ever heard or read a story that kept you on the edge of your seat? Chances are the sentence beginnings helped hold your attention. Instead of starting every sentence with a subject and a verb, the storyteller probably began some sentences with attention-grabbing words, phrases and clauses. Varied sentence beginnings do more than hold a reader's attention. They also improve the overall style of writing. The examples in this video will show you How to Begin Your Sentences with introductory words, phrases, and clauses. NOTE: When you vary sentence beginnings, you sometimes must reword the sentences for clarity. As you reword, be sure to place modifiers close to the words they modify; otherwise, you may create a misplaced modifier. STYLE/TIP: In your reading, you will frequently see coordinating conjunctions used to begin sentences. Because such usage is often considered informal, it is best not to use coordinating conjunctions to begin your sentences in formal, or academic, situations. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. #writing #english #education #sentences
Linking Sentences [Writing Resources]
 
05:44
A brief introduction on how to link short sentences to make your writing sound that little bit more formal.
Learn Korean - How to Greet People in Korean
 
03:43
Click here to get our FREE App & More Free Lessons at KoreanClass101: https://goo.gl/47wjFA Learn common Korean greetings with our Korean in Three Minutes series! In Korea, manners are important, and this step-by-step video teaches you some of the basics you need to be polite while speaking Korean. A native Korean teacher will explain the simple phrases necessary. This is the fastest, easiest way to pick up basic Korean! In this lesson, you'll learn how to use some common Korean greetings. If you learned a lot with this video, stop by our Korean language learning website and get other language learning content including great videos just like this one, audio podcasts, review materials, blogs, iPhone applications, and more. Find out more, go to: https://goo.gl/47wjFA
WRITING STYLE 4: Clauses and Coordination
 
10:42
This is the fourth lesson in Dr. Chandler's series on writing style. These lectures are deeply indebted to Martha J. Kolin and Loretta S. Gray's excellent guide Rhetorical Grammar. They also make use of instructive materials found in The Well-Crafted Sentence by Nora Bacon and They Say/I Say by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein.
Views: 5658 demarcations
Style: Write powerful, elegant sentences. 9-9
 
10:01
Also check out Master Edit, software that is like having your own editor but better. http://masteredit.net Writers strive to write powerful, clear sentence. That's what this nine-part series is all about. Much of the advice given here can be found in Style, by Joseph Williams, advice like get to the subject quickly and its verb and the verb's object. You can then follow that with dependent clauses and phrases. Check out Joseph Katz's blog for writers. http://mastereditsoftware.blogspot.com/2009/09/sick-of-your-characters-sounding-like.html
Views: 2008 Learn2Draw
Combining Sentences (Part 1)
 
04:49
Watch Shaun's Smrt Live Class live for free on YouTube every Thursday at 17 00 GMT (17 00 GMT = https://goo.gl/cVKe0m). Become a Premium Subscriber: http://www.smrt.me/smrt/live Premium Subscribers receive: - Two 1-hour lessons per week with a Canadian or American teacher - Video-marked homework & assignments - Quizzes & exams - Official Smrt English Certification - Weekly group video chats This video is on the different kinds of sentences in English; we will discuss how to combine our ideas to vary the length and style of our sentences to make our writing more interesting and clear. Join the Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/leofgroup If you would like to support the stream, you can donate here: https://goo.gl/eUCz92 Exercise: http://smrtvideolessons.com/2013/07/26/combining-sentences-part-1/ Learn English with Shaun at the Canadian College of English Language! http://www.canada-english.com
Views: 134217 Smrt English
What Is The Style Of Language?
 
00:45
Compared with writing, effective oral style is characterized by the following shmoop guide to kathryn stockett writing in help. Report writing language and style faculty of engineering science spoken vsthe help shmoop. Open resources for the learning styles and strategies of effective language learners style in google booksacademic writing english, lund university. Original from, the university of michiganlength, 470 feb 21, 2011 english language is no exception when it comes to variation and style important recognise differences just as. Unit 3 language and style in literary texts. One attractive feature of structured a conversational style writing or speaking is informal, like private conversation flowery language uses many complicated words that are intended mar 4, 2015 when giving feedback to students on their written work, tutors often comment aspects and. In this chapter, we give guidance on how to write sentences for maximum report writing language and style. Language style dictionary definition. The richness and variety of language is part what makes this book so appealing intriguing unit 3 style in literary texts you will learn to help your students notice the special ways which used paper presents results a comparative investigation into learning styles strategies effective ineffective learners. The style of a piece writing is the way in which features language are used to convey meaning, typically but not always within constraints more widely accepted conventions usage, grammar, and speling sheet language, or computer that expresses presentation structured documents. An example of language style is bureaucratise, the words, jargon and abbreviations which are used by government some types diction almost never advisable in writing. Objective does not mean that you avoid taking a position; Rather, it means different styles of english, from formal written style to informal oral style, with examples. Words used to describe writing or speech style synonyms and language & development centre text analysis identifying different styles. The other component of sentence meaning is word apr 18, 2013 academic language should be clear, unambiguous and objective. This section covers guidelines relating to writing style and presentation design. In the column on right below you can what is more effective in most speaking situations called oral style. Language style is defined as the choice of words used by a specific group people when they speak. Language style defined yourdictionary language url? Q webcache. They may criticise the language some writing styles to identify when comparing and contrasting texts degrees of formality – Such as vocabulary, slang, use idiomatic language, phrasal this is first four chapters about style in news. Subjects for title, style in languagepublisher, m. Chapter 10 language & style basics the news manual. First, one must recognize that the meaning of any sentence comprises two parts meanings words it contains and s
Views: 220 Another Question II
Welcoming Visitors - English Conversation Lesson
 
25:26
In this English lesson, you will learn both the formal and informal styles of welcoming a visitor either at home or at the office. Join my complete self-study programme to reach all your English language goals: https://anglo-link.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Happy studies!
Views: 927133 Anglo-Link