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How to Use Formal and Informal English - English Speaking and Writing Fluency
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about formal and informal English. You’ll learn how to recognise and use formal and informal styles in your spoken and written English. See the full lesson here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/formal-informal-english Contents: 1. Three Levels of Language 0:47 2. When to Use Formal, Neutral, or Informal Language 3:07 3. Sentence Structure in Formal and Informal English 6:18 4. Formal and Informal English Vocabulary 9:54 5. Directness in Formal and Informal English 13:58 6. Formal and Informal Written English 18:13 In this lesson you can learn: - The three levels of formality: Formal, Neutral, and Informal English. - When you should use formal, neutral, and informal English. - Sentence structure in formal and informal English. - Formal and informal English vocabulary. - Levels of directness in formal and informal English. - How to use formal and informal English in writing. See more free English lessons on our website: http://oxfordonlineenglish.com/
Views: 223576 Oxford Online English
Formal Writing
 
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Watch Shaun's Smrt Live Class live for free on YouTube every Thursday at 17 00 GMT (17 00 GMT = https://goo.gl/cVKe0m). Become a Premium Subscriber: http://www.smrt.me/smrt/live Premium Subscribers receive: - Two 1-hour lessons per week with a Canadian or American teacher - Video-marked homework & assignments - Quizzes & exams - Official Smrt English Certification - Weekly group video chats In this video, we will discuss the important differences between formal and informal language in written English. Students will learn the formal style which is more appropriate for academic English writing. Join the Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/leofgroup If you would like to support the stream, you can donate here: https://goo.gl/eUCz92 Exercise: http://smrtvideolessons.com/2013/07/26/formal-writing/ Learn English with Shaun at the Canadian College of English Language! http://www.canada-english.com
Views: 127571 Smrt English
Formal and Informal English Words | Learn English Vocabulary
 
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400+ Formal and Informal Words: https://7esl.com/formal-and-informal-words/ There are a lot of the differences between formal and informal English.
Views: 249988 7 E S L
Formal vs Informal Writing: What's the Difference and When to Use Them
 
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http://EzineArticles.com/ Before you start writing any article, one of the first things you need to ask yourself is "Who's my audience?" Answering this question will help you decide if you should use a formal writing style or an informal writing style. Watch this video to discover the difference between the two writing styles.
Views: 223269 EzineArticles
Formal English and informal English
 
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Sometimes formal and informal English can seem like two different languages. Sian's here to show you four features of informal English - and some ways you can make these features more formal. For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/towards-advanced/unit-19/session-1 Transcript: Hi, Sian here for BBC Learning English. In this Masterclass we're going to look at some differences between formal and informal English. Hey, how's it going? Good afternoon, how are you? Sometimes formal and informal can seem like two different languages. In the same way you wouldn't normally wear shorts and a t-shirt to a job interview, if you use language that's too formal or too informal, you can give a bad impression. Let's look at some differences between formal and informal English. Now, I received an email this morning. Have a look at this email - do you think the language is formal or informal - and why? Dear Mrs Brown, I'm writing to find out whether you have any jobs in your company this summer. At the mo I'm studying Economics at uni. I have been working part-time in a shop and recently they promoted me to the role of manager. I am enthusiastic. I work hard. I pay attention to detail. Ok, so that email used informal language and it's too informal for this style of letter. We're going to look at four features that make this informal and we're going to change it to make it more formal. Number one: choice of vocabulary. In informal English we use more common words and more phrasal verbs. For example here we have a phrasal verb: find out. It would be better to use a more formal equivalent like enquire. Same with jobs, this is quite informal, so instead let's use vacancies here. Instead we have "I'm writing to enquire whether you have any vacancies." Number two. It's more common in informal language to use abbreviations, contractions, shortened forms of verbs. Let's have a look. So, here we have at the mo, which is short for at the moment. This is OK when you're speaking, but not when you're writing. Here, we can use currently which is even more formal. Same here, uni is short for university, so don't use this short form in a letter. "Currently, I am studying Economics at university." Quite often in formal language we choose passive structures over active. Let's have a look here. The active sentences they promoted me is quite informal - it'd be much better to use a passive form here to make it more formal: I was promoted. So, "Recently I was promoted to the role of manager." This doesn't mean don't use active structures in a formal letter, but have a think about whether a passive one is more appropriate. Finally, in informal English, short, simple sentences are much more common. Whereas in formal English, we use more complex sentence structures. Take a look at this one. Here we have three short, simple sentences and this is fine in informal English, but in formal English it's better to use a complex structure. We can do this by adding relative pronouns or linkers. For example, "I am an enthusiastic person who works hard and pays attention to detail. So, would you kindly visit our website... ah, we're friends, that's too formal. Go to our website bbclearningenglish.com for more information about this and to practise formal and informal English. See you soon - goodbye!
Views: 113914 BBC Learning English
Writing Letters: formal & informal English
 
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A letter to your friend and a cover letter for a job application are written very differently. Whether you work in business or are taking the general IELTS or CELPIP test, knowing the difference between informal and formal writing is a skill you should have. Watch this writing lesson, take our quiz, and check out our resource page to become a better writer. - Use the resource: http://www.engvid.com/english-resource/formal-informal-english/ - Take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/writing-letters-formal-informal-english/ http://www.engvid.com/ TRANSCRIPT: Hello, my name is Emma, and in today's lesson we are going to learn about writing. What kind of writing? Writing letters. Okay? So this is important for people who work in business. It's also important for people who like to write letters to their friends maybe or to their grandparents in English. Also, it is very... It is a very useful video for anyone who is taking the general IELTS test. So if you're taking not academic, but general, this is an important video. And also, if you plan to immigrate to Canada and you want to do the Canadian immigration test which is called: "the CELPIP", this video is also... It will also be useful and helpful to you. Okay? So let's get started. What do I mean by "formal" and "informal"? "Informal" means something you would write to your friends, something you would write to your parents, - well, probably your parents unless you're afraid of your parents, then you might be more formal -, your classmates, your coworkers. Okay? So this is... It means it's not formal; it's for people you know well. On the other hand, "formal" English we use with strangers, we use with our boss, in the workplace, we use it in these different ways. So it's the English you really have to think about, whereas informal is kind of the relaxed English. So relaxed, serious. Okay? So, sometimes you will have to write a letter formally, maybe to your boss or your company, other times maybe you're on holiday and you want to write a letter to your friend, you'll use informal English. So what is the difference? Let's see. Informal English uses contractions. What are contractions? "Didn't", "wouldn't", "couldn't", "haven't", "hasn't". So if you see a verb with an apostrophe and then a "t", that is a contraction. Okay? It's very important to know this because in formal writing, you don't use contractions. "Didn't" would be: "Did not". I can write that for you. "Did not". Couldn't: could not, haven't: have not, can't: cannot. Okay? So that's one major difference. Another major difference between formal and informal writing is the use of idioms; the use of certain expressions. If I'm writing to my friend, maybe I'll say: "Oh, you know, I've been very under the weather lately." Meaning: I've been very sick. If I'm writing to my boss, I won't use idioms. If I'm writing a formal letter, I will not use idioms. Those aren't good to use in formal writing. Phrasal verbs, this is another thing we find in informal writing. What is a phrasal verb? It's a verb that has a preposition. Okay? So, for example: "find out", "find" is a verb, "out" is the preposition. "Go" is the verb, "up" is the preposition. So the... The preposition adds a different meaning to the verb. Phrasal verbs are very difficult to learn; we have so many of them in English. My students have told me phrasal verbs are one of the hardest parts of learning English, but it's possible, you can do it.
Examples of Business Email Writing in English - Writing Skills Practice
 
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Examples of Business Email Writing in English - Writing Skills Practice
Views: 343242 Kendra's Language School
American T Sounds: Practice with Business Sentences in a Formal Style
 
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Are you in Seattle? Join our next pronunciation class: https://www.arcos.institute/trainings/english-pronunciation Online Pronunciation course: http://speakmethod.com/750_business_words_main_page.html
Views: 81 Erica Rosi
Useful English greetings and responses -- Free English Lesson
 
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Useful English greetings and responses -- Free English Lesson You probably already know "hello" and "how are you?" However, English speakers don't always say "hello" and "how are you?" and answer I am fine. They also use many other English greetings and expressions to say slightly different things. Let's learn how to use some other simple formal and informal English greetings, as well as fun slang expressions that people around the world use to greet each other and their responses to it. How are you? Hey how's it going? Fine. This is a simple, straight answer. If you don't say anything else, though, it might be a signal that you don't want to continue the conversation. Not bad. This is a more friendly -sounding answer than "fine". Fine, thanks. This answer is formal. You might answer this way if someone you don't know, like a waiter at a restaurant, asks how you are. Very well, thanks. Pretty good. If you don't care as much about grammar, you can answer "Good" or "Pretty good". It's more common and casual. Great! How are you doing? This is an enthusiastic, excited response. It's always s good to ask a question back to the other person if you want to continue the conversation. I'm hanging in there. This answer makes it sound like you're having a tough day. I've been better. People usually give positive answers to the question "How are you?" If you give a negative answer like this one, it usually means that you want to tell the listener your sad story. So they'll usually ask what's wrong. What's up? What's new? What's happening? This question means "What's happening in your life?" But you don't have to answer honestly. If you don't want to start a long conversation, you can use one of these standard replies: 1) Nothing much. This is the most common answer. You can follow it by sharing something interesting that's happening: "Nothing much. Just getting ready for Vanessa's graduation." 2) Oh, just the usual. Answer this way if you do mostly the same things each day. 3) Oh gosh, all kinds of stuff ! You can answer this way if your life has been really busy and exciting lately. What's happening? This question means the same thing as "What's up" and can be answered in the same way. There certain slangs that are used by many people to greet each other such as : 1) Yo! 2) Howdy! And the response to it can be any of the above or 'Alright mate'.
15 different ways to say Goodbye in English - Free English vocabulary lesson ( ESL )
 
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15 different ways to say Goodbye in English : English speakers like a lot of variety in their everyday language. We have lots of different expressions for saying simple things. Previous videos have covered lots of ways to say different words. This video lesson by Nikharika does the same for different ways to say "goodbye" Formal Goodbyes: Goodbye: Farewell Take care Have a good day Casual goodbyes : Bye! Bye Bye! Later! See you later / Talk to you later So Long! All right then! Slang Goodbyes : Catch you later Peace! / Peace out I'm out! Smell you later
How 반말 Works - Casual/Informal Language in Korean [TalkToMeInKorean]
 
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As you may already be familiar with it, there are mainly two politeness levels in Korean: 반말 [ban-mal] and 존댓말 [jon-daet-mal]. There are various types and levels within 반말 and 존댓말, but very broadly, 반말 refers to casual and informal language, whereas 존댓말 refers to formal and polite language. At first, when you are strangers, you start off with 존댓말, but depending on how well you know the other person and how old you are in comparison with the other person, you might start using 반말. But due to exposure to many K-pop songs, Korean dramas and movies, where you can see a lot of 반말 sentences without much contextual clues, We find that many Korean learners seem to overuse 반말. It is GREAT to be able to use 반말 naturally and appropriately, but at the same time, using 반말 when you are not supposed to can cause trouble or misunderstanding. So we have made this video lesson about when and with whom you can and can't speak in 반말. If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments! 감사합니다! Photo credits: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/13903385550/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/seite-3/543642045/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/waltstoneburner/9253192330 https://www.flickr.com/photos/danielfoster/14813000931
Views: 124645 Talk To Me In Korean
What your speaking style, like, says about you | Vera Regan | TEDxDublin
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. How we use language - our accent, expressions, and the structure of our sentences - changes from region to region. Vera Regan explains why we should listen to these differences, and why language can act as a cultural barometer. Sociolinguist Vera Regan is a researcher at University College Dublin, and her work explores the relationship between our cultural landscape and our changing language. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 2994853 TEDx Talks
Different ways to say 'Thank you'. - Free English Vocabulary lesson
 
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Different ways to say 'Thank you'. - Free English lesson Why do you say thank you to someone? By using the words 'thank you' is your way of saying you appreciate what they have done. This means you are thanking a person for something they have done or saying for someone else. In this lesson you will learn how to say thank you in different ways with some basic examples of how to use in your sentences. How to use 'thank you' in sentences? There will be times when a simple thank you is not enough the following examples show you how to use in your own sentence's. Thanks. Thanks a lot. Thank you very much. Thank you so much. Thank you kindly. I can't thank you enough. I don't know how to thank you. Thank you for all your help. How to use the above examples in a sentence? Thanks for helping today. Thanks a lot for washing the car. Thank you very much for all your presents. Thank you kindly for lending me some money. I can't thank you enough for all the work you have done for me. Thanks, for helping me when I fell and injured myself, I don't know how to thank you. Thank you for all your help today I wound not have finished painting the room without you. It is best to be polite at all times Remember it is always best to be polite. so if someone helps you in any way it is considered polite to say thank you even if it is just those two words.
Improve your Writing: Show, Not Tell
 
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Become a better writer, no matter what you're writing! I'll show you how to take simple, boring sentences and turn them to vibrant, expressive writing. As you practice this technique in your writing, you will find it carries over to your everyday spoken English as well. Before you know it, you'll be a more dynamic, compelling speaker and writer. Next, watch this video to improve your vocabulary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxjsWwgPjwM Take the quiz on this lesson at: https://www.engvid.com/english-writing-show-not-tell/ TRANSCRIPT Welcome back to engVid. Here we are with a writing lesson. We are looking at the skill of showing, not telling, and it's going to transform your writing as long as you put it into practice afterwards. "Show, not tell. What's he talking about?" When we're writing we want to avoid simple statements that don't really add any description or flavour. For example: "The man was stressed." [Snores] Boring. Instead, I want you to paint a picture, I really want you to describe the man is stressed without telling me that he is. So how can you do that? We're kind of trying to avoid this word, and describe it instead. So what's he doing? "The man was fidgeting. Ah, he's fidgeting. He's so stressed, he can't sort of stay still. And biting his nails." Okay? So pick out a couple of details that show how the person was. Next one: "The room was messy." Again, it's a simple, simple sentence. It's just one sort of main clause and it's not very interesting. Much better to describe the items in the room that make it messy. For example: "There was a leftover pizza, dirty clothes were strewn"... I'll write that word for you. That means they were covering the floor. "...and there were dirty plates and cups". Okay? These details give us the idea that it is messy. Example three: "The woman was confident." Okay, but it would be much more effective if you described how she was confident. So, how does she move? How do other people react to her? "She strode", that means she walked, but with purpose. Okay? So I've picked an interesting verb. "She strode into the room, and everyone turned their heads to notice her." Okay? Much clearer, more vivid idea of confidence than just saying she was confident. Example four: "The boy was careful." Tell us how he was careful. "He placed his favourite magazine in the top drawer of his cabinet." Okay? So we need to say exactly what he is placing, the object there has been missed out. "He placed"... There's no room for me to write it. You get the idea, he places his favourite book or magazine, and look how specific it is: "the top drawer of his cabinet". Next example: "The stadium was full." Again, I'm bored with this simple sentence construction. We need to make it more interesting. "The sound from the stadium was deafening", okay? And then give us some main action perhaps: "The sound from the stadium was deafening as the crowd rose up to chant the player's name." Okay? Give the sense that the stadium is full from what you can see and what you can hear. Okay? A couple of ones to describe weather. "It was hot." Okay? Well, a very young child could write a sentence like that, so if you're sort of a teenager or an adult, it's time to raise the bar. How can we tell that it is hot? Well: "The sun was causing damage to", "The sun was melting", "The sun was burning", "The sun was causing the lady's skin to turn red". Okay? Pick out details that show the effect. "It was cold. It was cold." How do we know it was cold? How cold did it feel? What can you see? "Drainpipes were freezing, ice was as thick as"... I don't know. "It was three inches thick." Whatever, you've got to show details rather than just stating things. -"It was windy." -"The umbrella was totally bent out of shape. The umbrella"-you know for keeping the rain off us-"was totally"-that means fully-"bent"-Yeah? Bent-"...out of shape", out of its normal position. "He found it funny." Right? How funny did he find it? Okay? Better to... For us to get the idea to picture what he was doing: "He was rolling around the floor in hysterics." Okay? When you're so... Find something so funny, you're like: [Laughs]. Okay? He can't control his body he finds it so funny. "Hysterics", that means like totally lost control. "Hysteria". Okay? Hysterics. "In hysterics" means finding something really, really funny. "The castle was captured." Right. I want to get a sense of drama. I want to imagine what's happening there at the castle. Is the king having his head cut off? Are the new army marching in? What's happening? "The new flag was hoisted up on high, greeted by a cheer from the crowd." Okay? Paint pictures, pick out details. Okay? It's good to have a range of adjectives, but how can you show those adjectives? How can you describe them instead? Thank you for watching today's video. Have a go at the quiz after this, and I'll see you very soon. Remember to subscribe. Bye.
English Writing Workshop - Clear and Concise Sentences
 
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This video covers the following topics: What is a sentence? Subject -- Verb -- Object, noun phrases, adverb phrases, sentence length, passive sentences, parallel sentences and sentence fragments.
Views: 15039 mylearningadvisor
Syntax - The Formal Analysis of Sentences (VLC Series #4)
 
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In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the formal analysis of a sentences: First, in terms of its simple and phrasal categories and then by looking at the clausal structure.
The Four Types of Sentences in Academic Writing
 
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Sentence writing Academic writing
Views: 200 Sean Balme
5 Idioms to Use in Your IELTS TOEFL Essay
 
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Idioms add natural style to your English writing. If used correctly, they can make your essay more interesting and engaging. These 5 idioms are useful when looking at two sides of a thing, a choice, a decision, and so on. These are especially good for advantages vs disadvantages type questions, compare, agree/disagree, and others. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 617862 Write to Top
English Grammar - Inversion: "Had I known...", "Should you need..."
 
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http://www.engvid.com Should you need help understanding why the subject in this sentence comes after the verb, I can show you. In this English grammar lesson, we will look at sentences in which the subject and verb order is inverted, and the particular situations in which to use them. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-inversion/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about inversion. Now, what does "inversion" mean? "Inversion" is when you change the order of something. Right? So we're looking at grammar. Usually, you know in a sentence a subject comes first and then a verb. Today we're going to look at situations where that is reversed. Now, of course, I'm sure that you know that in questions: "Are you sure?" the verb comes before the subject in all questions. That's what makes a question structure a question structure. However, there are other situations where we have this inversion, but we're looking at a sentence; we're not looking at a question. Now, the thing to understand about inversions is that they are very particular. There are only a few expressions that you're going to use inversion with. You can't put them in just about... In just any sentence that you want. The examples that I've written on the board are the ones that you might read or that you might want to write. There are other situations that use this, but unless you're writing poetry or artistic, creative novels - you don't need them and you don't really need to worry about them either. They're very rare. It's very rare you'll see them. It's very, very formal language style. And you'll recognize them, hopefully, when you do see them. So let's start here. When we have "not only". Generally speaking, when we have a sentence that begins with a negative, we're going to have inversion, but especially when you have "not only", you're going to have inversion. Okay? "Not only did he", so there's your verb, there's your subject, there's your verb. Okay? We have the helping verb, the auxiliary verb to start. "Not only did he win", and then we have the "but", "also" to go with "not only". This is like an expression that's fixed; you're always going to be looking at the same thing. "Not only did he win, but he also broke the record." Whatever. "Not only", inversion, "but also". "Under no circumstances", this is another expression that you'll see regularly. And again, we're looking at the negative construction which is why we're looking at the inversion. "Under no circumstances should you call her/call him." Okay? Whatever you do, don't call. "Under no circumstances". "Circumstances", basically situation. In no situation should you call. In no situation, same idea. Okay? Another negative: "nor". What is "nor"? Is the negative of "or". Okay? "Or", "nor". Again, many people don't use this word anymore; it's a little bit old-fashioned, a little bit high formality level. But... "The mayor of Toronto refused to resign, nor do we expect him to." Okay? So after "nor", we still have the inversion. Verb, subject, verb. Verb, subject. Okay? I'm not sure if you know the mayor of Toronto, he's very famous now. We're not very proud, but that's a whole other story. Next, so these are the three negatives. These two are also very similar. Again, very formal style, but you might see it, you might want to use it in your essays or whatever. "Should you need any help, don't hesitate to call." What does this mean? "Should you need", if you need. "Should" is just a more formal way to say: "if". "If you need any help, don't hesitate to call.", "Should you need any help, don't hesitate to call." Now, this is a verb, subject, verb. If we use: "if", then there's no issue. Then you have "if" which is a conjunction, adverb, clause, conjunction, subject, verb. "Should" makes it verb, subject, verb. "Had" is the same thing with the "if", but a different structure of the conditional, a different "if" structure. "Had I known you were coming, I would have changed." "If I had known", "If I had known you were coming", "Had I known", it's basically you're making the sentence a little bit shorter, a little more formal. You're starting with a verb, a subject, and another verb. Okay? Past perfect, of course. So these are the conditionals, these are the no's. Now, we have the comparatives, when you're comparing something. When you're comparing an action, so you're using the clause marker: "as", not the preposition: "like". So: "John speaks Chinese, as does Lucy." Okay? "Lucy" is actually the subject, here's the verb, here's a subject. Now, I could put a period and put a new sentence. "So does Lucy." Same idea. "Lucy does as well." If I want the subject, verb order. But when you start with "as", you're going to invert the order. This is a clause marker, adverb clause marker to compare.
√ Formal Writing Basics | Essay Writing | English
 
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#iitutor #English #EssayWriting https://www.iitutor.com/ Formal writing is the style you should be looking to achieve in writing essays. There are a number of qualities to formal writing which we will outline in this video. We will also go through some common language errors. Formal writing is third-person, impersonal and objective. This means that everything is written based on fact. Constructing an argument is simple as choosing which ‘fact’ supports your case, and allowing it to support your definition. Formal writing requires grammar to be used in a ‘perfect’ manner. Writing in complex sentences ensures each idea is detailed and explained. Formal writing is impersonal and must use ‘proper’ English. Consult grammar guides if you are unsure. Language is best described as scholarly or academic. It must avoid opinionated, emotional or unnecessarily descriptive statements. Academic language means you are presenting facts and indicating knowledge. It must be direct and explicit: as in, not vague. Your writing must be organised in a way where your interpretation can be represented as fact, rather than just your opinion. By providing your own definition, and basing your argument on your discussion and evidence, you are writing in a formal way. Some things to avoid: Contractions, You or I; we and us, Unnecessary adjectives, Vague, unspecific points, Opinionated statements and Starting with conjunctions.
Views: 328 iitutor.com
How to Write a  Formal Letter
 
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Need to write a formal letter for the IELTS general test, task 1? Maybe you just need to write emails for business or other purposes. In this video, we look at the basic structure and content of a formal letter. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 241795 Write to Top
Welcoming Visitors - English Conversation Lesson
 
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In this English lesson, you will learn both the formal and informal styles of welcoming a visitor either at home or at the office. Join my complete self-study programme to reach all your English language goals: https://anglo-link.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Happy studies!
Views: 912463 Anglo-Link
How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson
 
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✅ https://youtu.be/puNo0sxC3VI 👉 Check the latest Video - American Idioms I love to use the most? How to improve your English writing skills? - Free English lesson I will share easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. • Avoid using contractions – Do not use contractions while constructing your sentences, esp. if you are writing a business email or formal letters i.e. words like don’t, can’t, shouldn’t, couldn’t, wouldn’t, isn’t, haven’t should be avoided. • Avoid there are/ there is – It will make your sentence more lengthy and boring to read. e.g There are many problems in her class (incorrect) Her class is facing many problems. (Correct) There is an exhibition at the hotel. (Incorrect) The hotel is holding an exhibition. (Correct) • Avoid using unnecessary words in your sentences like very; really, a lot instead use better vocabulary. It will definitely not change the meaning of your sentence but will make it sound interesting. Students think literature is very hard. Students think literature is difficult. • Make use of strong verbs – It will make your sentence sound more appropriate and concrete. He gave assistance to my friend. (weak verb) My friend assisted him. (Strong verb)
active sentences
 
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A lesson describing how to write active sentences, with subjects and verbs working together effectively.
Views: 7799 Style Academy
How to change Basic English into Business English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to get that job? Improve your image? Sound more professional? Learn how to transform simple English words to business English vocabulary and watch your career take off! I'll show you how to change "get" to "receive", " make sure" to "ensure", "give more information" to "elaborate", and more. These small vocabulary changes will make a huge difference in your English level. Test yourself on this lesson at http://www.engvid.com/how-to-change-basic-english-into-business-english/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi. My name is Rebecca from www.engvid.com. Today, you're going to learn how to speak more professionally in business situations. Now, at times, it's all right to use informal language. It's acceptable in everyday situations. But there are times when you'll want to create a more powerful impression. And at that time, you'll want to be able to use business English. What's the difference between general English and business English? Well, sometimes, there's not very much difference. Sometimes, general English is used in business contexts. But sometimes, you use a higher-level word. And that's what I'm going to teach you in this lesson. Let's look at some really easy, common examples. For example, if you say -- or if you want to say, "I got your email", in regular English, you might just say, "I got your email." What would you say if you want to make it business English? You would say -- I'm giving you a clue. The word starts with R. Instead of saying, "I got your email"; "I received your email." Okay? Now, it becomes more formal and more business-like. Suppose you want to tell someone, "I need your help" or, "I need some help." What word could you use that starts with R instead of "need"? "Require." So instead of saying -- and you can also change more than the verb. The verb is the key, but you could say -- instead of saying, "I need some help", you could say, "I require some assistance." Now, you've changed two words, the verb and also a noun. Let's try another one. "Let's talk about it later." Which business word could you use? "Let's discuss -- let's discuss it later." That sounds much more professional than saying, "Let's talk about it later." Next one. "How do I get in touch with her?" What word could you use instead of that? "How do I contact her?" Okay? Good. "Please make sure you arrive on time." Which business word could you use instead of "make sure"? "Please ensure you arrive on time." "Please give her your travel plans." Instead of saying "give", you could say, "Please provide her with your itinerary." There, we've changed another word. Instead of saying "travel plan" or "travel plans", you could use the word "itinerary". An "itinerary" is usually a piece of paper or a document that lists your travel plans, when you're departing, when you're arriving, where, when, and so on. "Please let them know when you will be arriving." "Please let them know" -- instead of that, you could say, "Please inform them of your arrival." Okay? Good. "Please tell me why you've made this decision." "Please explain your decision." "Could you please talk some more about that subject?" "Could you please elaborate? Could you please elaborate on that." Now, this is actually a very useful word if you go to a conference or a meeting and you want someone to speak some more about a particular point or issue. It's a good, kind of, question to learn. "Could you please elaborate on that?" So "to elaborate" means to speak more or talk more, give more information. "How are you going to fix this problem?" Better than using the word "fix" is the word "solve". "How are you going to solve this problem?" All right? So try to do that for every simple word that you know and basic word that you know in general English, try to find a slightly more formal version, which will be your business English word. And use these words in an office environment. If you've found this helpful, please subscribe to my channel on YouTube. And if you'd like to do a quiz on this subject, you can also go to our website, www.engvid.com. Thanks very much. Good luck with your English.
Formal Letter Writing | CBSE Official Letters | Writing Applications | Sample Letters
 
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Formal Letter Writing | CBSE Schools | Writing Official Letters | Writing Applications | Sample Letters by The English Academy This video teaches you on Formal letter Writing as per CBSE Syllabus. Also included in this lesson is a Sample letter explaining how to write formal letters and applications and letters of complaints Also See our website https://www.successcds.net Follow us: http://www.facebook.com/SuccessCD http://google.com/+successcds https://twitter.com/entranceexam https://twitter.com/successcds http://www.youtube.com/successcds1 http://www.youtube.com/englishacademy1
Views: 1505827 English Academy
How to Paraphrase
 
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Good writing needs variety and style. One way to do this is by paraphrasing so that we avoid using the same words and sentences. This lesson goes over the basics of strong paraphrasing, especially for those who need to take the IELTS or TOEFL exams. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 120115 Write to Top
IELTS Write in FORMAL Academic Style - FACTOR
 
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http://e-fluentenglish.com Enjoy this FREE sample video from my e-Course: MC2 Write in FORMAL Academic Style Do you use the word 'thing' a lot when you can't think of a more precise word? Using 'nothing words like THING will reduce your marks in IELTS! You must be precise! (Lexical response 25%) SUBSCRIBE to my website for a free eBook: 'How to write sentences in English and raise your score in IELTS.' Youtube: http://youtube.com/cleonapattersonefluentenglish Facebook: http://facebook.com/efluentenglish Twitter: http://twitter.com/efluentenglish Google+: http://google.com/+efluentenglish Perhaps you need to build your English vocabulary.! FACTOR (noun) Did you know that the word FACTOR is one of the most frequently used academic words? It is on SUBLIST 1 of A.W.L (Academic Word List) Check out my AWL e-Course Video Pack. It will help you learn academic words step-by-step! TRANSCRIPT Hello, this is Cleona at e-fluentenglish.com 'MC2 How to Write in FORMAL Academic Style'. Vocabulary. If you're writing in Academic Style you need to use academic vocabulary. Let's go to the (AWL) Academic Word List. This is a list of 570 headwords and then there are many other words. If you look at SUBLIST 1 there are 8 words: factor, benefit, issue, research, vary, area, define, and environment. So I would like to make 8 videos that cover these 8 important academic words. When you understand them, um...then you will be able to use them Use them in academic essays. This will advance your vocabulary. Let's look at the first one, FACTOR. FACTOR is a noun, it means influence. Let's look at this example. 'Michelle's legal problems were not a factor in her decision'. She has problems, legal problems. And we said that factor means to influence. These problems didn't influence her decision. So her ... legal problems didn't contribute to her final decision. Let's look at synonyms for the word FACTOR. Component, feature, consideration, item, circumstance, fact. All of these synonyms can be used to paraphrase the word FACTOR. Can you think of a way of using FACTOR in a sentence? Think about an IELTS essay, you're talking about Education. How could I talk about FACTOR in a sentence about Education? Write your example below. Put the word FACTOR in a context. Thank you Bye-bye
Views: 18 Cleona Patterson
Combining Sentences (Part 2)
 
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Watch Shaun's Smrt Live Class live for free on YouTube every Thursday at 17 00 GMT (17 00 GMT = https://goo.gl/cVKe0m). Become a Premium Subscriber: http://www.smrt.me/smrt/live Premium Subscribers receive: - Two 1-hour lessons per week with a Canadian or American teacher - Video-marked homework & assignments - Quizzes & exams - Official Smrt English Certification - Weekly group video chats This video is on the different kinds of sentences in English; we will discuss how to combine our ideas to vary the length and style of our sentences to make our writing more interesting and clear. Join the Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/leofgroup If you would like to support the stream, you can donate here: https://goo.gl/eUCz92 Exercise: http://smrtvideolessons.com/2013/07/26/combining-sentences-part-1/ Learn English with Shaun at the Canadian College of English Language! http://www.canada-english.com
Views: 60783 Smrt English
How to write a semi-formal letter for IELTSG Task 1
 
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Taking the IELTS General test? See a task 1 letter, from opening to fulfilling the requirements of the task to closing. The letter requires a more simple approach to writing than the essay, but the elements must all be complete. See how. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 57971 Write to Top
Writing is Painless 1: Sentence Structure
 
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Sentence structure is the basic building block for writing an effective academic essay. Learning the four sentence types isn't difficult; it just takes time and practice.
Views: 95529 Saundra Rinehart
5 tips to improve your writing
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Want to become a better writer? In this video, I will share five easy and quick tips that will improve writing in formal and academic settings. If you're in college or university or plan to study overseas, this video is for you! Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/5-tips-to-improve-your-writing/ Next, watch my Top 5 Writing Tips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xu2gm-Y4RXs
WRITING – Advanced English Transitions: thereby, thereof, hereby, therein, wherein, whereby...
 
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Good writing makes use of transition words, thereby creating better flow and adding some style to the text. In this lesson we'll look at some linking words and transitions used to connect ideas, such as: "thereby", "thereof", "hereby", "therein", "wherein", "whereby", and more. This will make your writing clear and organized. Watch the video to improve your writing style. Now it's time for a lesson on some different transitions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsDR3XEv50E&index=103&list=PLxYD9HaZwsI5C0d8CivHvoI_-0rs8XMfc&t=0s TAKE THE QUIZ ON THIS LESSON: https://www.engvid.com/writing-advanced-english-transitions TRANSCRIPT Hi again, everybody. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's video we're going to look at transitions. Now, you may have seen some other videos on engVid about transitions, especially for writing. What we're going to look at today are a few more specific transitions, but this time we're not looking at transitions between paragraphs or even transitions between sentences. Okay? We're looking at transitions that we are generally using in a sentence to shift from one idea to another idea in a sentence. So they're very similar to, like, adverb... Adverb clauses, for example, but they're used in different ways. But, again, they do have their specific purposes. Now, you'll also notice that all of them or most of them start with: "there" plus a preposition, or "where" plus a preposition, and we have the one special one: "hereby". So: "Thereby", "Thereof", "Thereafter", "Therein", "Therefore", "Wherein", "Whereby", "Hereby", these are the words we're going to look at and how they're used within sentences. Now, before I explain these to you and show them... Show you samples of how they're used, I want you to understand that these are generally very formal, very high-end. They're not very commonly used. There are other ways you can say these things without being too serious, I guess you could say. But if you're going to university, if you're going to take a test, IELTS, TOEFL, SAT, all these tests - you will see these and you should be able to use them as well. And if you can actually use them properly in your essays, and like, again, nicely, appropriately, good timing, your score... That'll help your score. It should go up quite a bit because these are not very easy to use. So, we're going to start with "thereby". "Thereby" basically means by which, or through which, or like through this action something happened. It's a little bit similar to: "due to". The only problem is you can't use it in the same structure as "due to". Okay? So let's look at the first sentence. "The team lost the final game of the season, thereby missing the playoffs." So, basically by doing this, by losing the last game, the result... What happened? They missed the playoffs. But notice that we are using an "ing" here: "...thereby missing the playoffs", right? This is basically a gerund expression, a gerund phrase, but we can't use this with a clause. We're using it with an "ing". So that's one thing you have to keep in mind. If I wanted to use "due to", I would have to change the whole structure. "Due to their loss in the final game of the season, the team missed the playoffs." A completely different structure. I'm using the independent clause, here, the "due to" with the cause, etc. This one gives you another option, basically, on how to link the ideas. Cause, effect. But we don't have to use the "ing", we can use another way. "Lisa studied for three straight weeks and was thereby able to pass her test." So she studied, studied, studied, and through this action she was able to pass her test. And: "...and was thereby", "...and she was thereby able". Notice that I'm not using this to start the clause; I'm using it within the clause, between the verbs to show through this action, this was the result that she was looking for. Okay? So: "by which", "through which action". Let's look at "therein". "The new contract does not allow for extended maternity leave;" here I'm using the semi-colon, I'm going to give you the next idea, so this is like a conjunction. "...therein lies the problem for the union, 60% of whose membership is young women". So, "therein" basically means in that, or into that situation, problem, position, state, etc. So, "therein". "Therein" means: In what? In this situation, in this new contract there's a problem. So: "...therein in this new contract lies a problem", and this is a very common follow-up to the transition "therein". "...therein lies the problem". A very famous expression: "...therein lies the rub" from Shakespeare. "Aye, there's the rub." I'm not sure if you know that expression, I think from Hamlet, dream to... If you dream and you can die, it's all good, but then: Oh, there's a problem - you don't wake up. So: "...therein lies the rub". A very common expression to use with "lies". […]
Happy Birthday wish के लिए नए English Sentences सीखों - English speaking course in Hindi
 
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Happy Birthday wish के लिए नए English Sentences सीखों - English speaking Practice Lesson in Hindi | English speaking course in Hindi Wishing birthday is a very common and saying just ‘Happy birthday’ is more common. Why not learn some English speaking sentences to give birthday wishes in many different ways. In this English speaking practice lesson you will learn some interesting spoken English sentences to give birthday wishes in different situations. Some of them are formal English sentences and some are informal. We hope our spoken English learning videos are helping you to improve your English. You are watching this English lesson on Learnex – English lessons for hindi speakers. On our channel you would get lessons related to Grammar, English conversation practice, English vocabulary and much more to speak fluent English faster and better. You are watching this video on Learnex, where you learn English through Hindi. We have a library of English lessons in hindi specifically designed for Hindi speakers. Access through our pool of free English lessons covering topics such as - English Grammar, English conversation, Communication skills, Vocabulary, English practice, English speaking for the real world, Spoken English tips to improve you English, Personality development, IELTS training & Coaching, Job interview skills and much more to help you speak fluent English faster and better. 👉For All lessons topic wise, visit our website - http://www.hindi.learnex.in/ =========================================== Our Social Media - 👉Facebook - @learnexone http://www.facebook.com/learnexone 👉Instagram - @letstalkpodcast http://www.instagram.com/letstalkpodcast ============================================= Watch lessons topic wise - 👉English Sentence Practice - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xHNy7bE-7Gg&list=PLry0Rv5X75bRk3yD9eMgQCRmSF29pS00k 👉English Conversation Practice - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jtGLsnU6_E&list=PLry0Rv5X75bSFBbOTKpf62gnvBoA2QHIq 👉English Grammar in Hindi - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lN9KulWfm0&list=PLry0Rv5X75bSTNL0U8F8MqDLMsBB0v_xW 👉All English Lessons in Hindi - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhvgt_fdBV8&list=PLry0Rv5X75bSCqmunscVB5FnZ_f5alwzb I👉mprove English Pronunciation - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yfa5PaojTo&list=PLry0Rv5X75bRzzpwOp2MwhyFjEYBiHk7X 👉Personality Development Training in Hindi- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExLbvQut9ko&list=PLry0Rv5X75bQ3EwC8Iuhu-pp-PQFbx771 =============================================== Watch English Lessons Trainer wise - 👉Learn English with JENNY - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dVTwGWaBVk&list=PLry0Rv5X75bR_2XUp79rY0Jp7IxyAoNgD 👉Speak English with MICHELLE - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aKhbIPYQJg&list=PLry0Rv5X75bR6yr4eLp-ffcnEhV5aio51 👉English Lessons by SONIA- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6d8mAMlFvXw&list=PLry0Rv5X75bTQVyEIAih18SjfkG9T_uP5 👉Learning English with RIMA- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooNKoSwp3nU&list=PLry0Rv5X75bQFGcQCOLqpYVTteH-lBEY_ 👉English with KABIR - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lB6_zXj9oEg&list=PLry0Rv5X75bT2hKAjkBXCb_GnQokO6y0B 👉English Lessons by ALISHA- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4QsNDnxptI&list=PLry0Rv5X75bQn3wJbMJ9SkrMyGq1Dnpo- ================================================== Our Other Channels - 👉Skillopedia - Skills for the real world http://www.youtube.com/skillopedia 👉Daily Video Vocabulary - Learn a new English Word dailyhttp://www.youtube.com/letstalkpodcast 👉Let’s Talk - ESL http://www.youtube.com/letstalk
Writing Skills: The Paragraph
 
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http://www.engvid.com The paragraph is the most important unit of a well-written essay. The paragraph has a specific structure and standards that make it effective and enjoyable to read. In this writing lesson we will look at how to construct good paragraphs and improve writing with better flow and clarity. After the lesson, take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/writing-skills-paragraph/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about the paragraph. It's a writing lesson, and I want to show people what a paragraph is and how to construct one, what to do, what not to do so you can write very clear, very tight paragraphs. This is especially important for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students but everybody has to follow the exact same rules. Now before I even begin, I must say that I'm talking mostly about academic writing or even business writing. Creative writing like novels or short stories, anything fiction, you can do anything you want. Only always remember: somebody has to read what you wrote so it has to be clear. But academic essays, for example, certain rules you have to follow; you have to be very careful about them. So let's begin. In terms of like the actual way a paragraph looks: you have to indent or skip a line. So let me just make sure you understand what an indent is. This is an indent, the first line a little bit pushed in or you can make sure you skip a line between paragraphs. But don't do both. If you skip a line, don't indent. Okay? That's the main thing. Now, that's in terms of the way it looks. In terms of content -- and this, I can't stress this enough -- very, very, very important: one central idea in one paragraph. Okay? I've seen many people, I've seen many essays where you start a paragraph talking about one thing, and then you go off on a tangent and talk about something completely unrelated. So for example: if you start a paragraph and you're talking about apples, continue to talk about apples. If you go to oranges, that's maybe okay because you're still talking about fruit. But if you start with apples, go to oranges, go to bananas, and then end up with monkeys in space there's a bit of a problem; the reader has no idea what you're talking about. One paragraph, one central idea. Now, make sure that you tell the reader what this central idea is. This is your thesis statement. Okay? It's a very general sentence. All it does is introduce the topic of the paragraph, nothing else. All the details comes after. So speaking of details, we'll talk about details in detail, but all other ideas, all the other sentences, all your sentences with the details must directly relate back to the main idea. So let's say here is your thesis statement; very general, every sentence after must relate back to that thesis statement. Okay? You can't go off to another idea. Everything must support this, must talk about the same topic. Very important. Okay? How long should your paragraph be? Technically, a paragraph could be one sentence, but in an academic essay that rarely happens. But it could be any length you want, as long as you're still on that one topic, as long as you still have things to write and things to say about that topic, say it. If you have four sentences, fine; if you have 10 sentences, also okay. Again, for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students: four, five sentences should be your limit. You can't be too long because you don't have time and you're going to start making mistakes. So now, the details. Very important to have lots of details. Why is this topic important to your overall idea of your essay? Not only tell me what is the topic, what is the thesis statement of the paragraph, make sure you explain to me why this is important to the general idea of the essay. Give me your reasons. Now, why is it important? And then reasons, why you think what you're saying supports this idea. Examples, always use examples because giving me the reasons is okay; examples make me see exactly what you're trying to say. Very easy for me to understand what you're trying to say. Now, in terms of flow, in terms of the way the reader can approach the paragraph, you have to have bridges. What is, what do bridges mean? Basically, when you have one idea in this sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence. Every sentence must have a link to the next sentence. This creates flow, makes it much easier to read and understand, and it keeps you on the one topic. Now, key terms. If you're talking about something specific and you have to use a key term, use it as many times as you need to. Otherwise, avoid repetition. Try not to use the same word more than once in one paragraph. Okay? For example: if you're using the word "moreover" in the paragraph, don't use it, don't use "moreover" again -- use "in addition to", use "furthermore", "another", etc. Try to avoid using one word more than once, especially in the same paragraph.
Writing an email – 18 – English at Work has the words for perfect emails
 
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Anna's having trouble with her emails. She's been trying to sort out the order of Imperial Lemons for Mr Lime. She sends an email but her choice of text-speak isn't appropriate and Paul, the boss, isn't impressed. Anna needs some help from Tom who always has plenty of advice. Her email is rewritten and sent off, but will that be the end of the matter? For more English at Work and other great content:: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/english-at-work TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Hello, Anna's just arrived at her desk to start the day at Tip Top Trading. Paul is walking towards her, eating a biscuit, he looks a bit bothered. Paul: Anna? Anna: Yes, Paul. Paul: Come and have a biscuit in my office. Now Anna, about Mr Lime. Anna: I didn't say yes! Paul: Pardon? Yes to what? Anna: Oh, nothing. Paul: You sent him an email yesterday and copied me in. Anna: Yes. Paul: Your email reads: boxes ok. pls c-d-u cfirm wnt 300 ta. Anna: Yes: please could you confirm you want 300. Paul: Right. Now that's not really the best way of writing an email to a client, is it? Anna: Oh. Paul: Please could you re-send your message to Mr Lime, using actual words that make sense. Anna: Okay. Paul: Thank you. Have a chocolate crunchy! Anna: Thanks. Tom: Morning Anna. Anna: Hello. Tom: Let me guess, Paul just spoke to you about your email? Anna: How do you know? Tom: You copied me in remember, I just read it – or tried to. Anna: But what's the problem? Other people write like that! Tom: No, maybe some people write text messages like that in an SMS message on their phones, but that is completely the wrong style for an email to a client. Narrator: Okay Anna, let's stop listening to Tom, he's a waste of space. These are the kinds of phrases you need in a business-related email: Dear Mr Lime... I hope you are well. I am writing regarding... Please could you confirm... Yours sincerely, or Best wishes. Anna: Thank you! I'll rewrite my message. There! I'd better get it checked before I send. Denise? Denise: (On the phone) yes... the other problem with Stephanie is that her legs are just too long... Anna: Oh, she's on the phone. Denise: ... yes, like trees... Anna: I'll have to ask Tom. Tom? Tom: Mm? Anna: Could you read this through before I send it? Tom: Hang on, Anna, let me just finish this sentence. It’s really important. I’m ready, let’s have a look. Okay. (reading) Dear Mr Lime, I hope you are well. I am writing regarding your request for luxury boxes for the Imperial Lemon Delivery. We will indeed be able to supply them. Please could you confirm that you want 300. Best wishes, Anna. Anna: Well? Tom: It’s good, it's much better. Send it. Hopefully Mr Lime will think your last message was just someone sitting on your keyboard by mistake. Anna: Thanks. Tom: You're not... Anna: What? Tom: Nothing. It's none of my business. Anna: What? Tom: You're not ever going to go to lunch with Mr Lime are you? I mean, in a non-business way... Anna: No of course not! Tom: I mean I don’t care… it's just... important to... stay professional. Anna: Yes. Narrator: Hmmm.... well, I had a feeling Anna's email was going to cause problems. But at least she won't make a mistake like that again. Here’s a reminder of the phrases she used in her new, improved email. Dear Mr Lime... I hope you are well. I am writing regarding... Please could you confirm... Best wishes. Until next time, bye!
Views: 126524 BBC Learning English
The 4 Sentence Cover Letter That Gets You The Job Interview
 
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Join career expert and award-winning author Andrew LaCivita as he teaches you exactly how to write the 4 sentence cover letter that gets you the job interview! Grab the FREE template here: http://bit.ly/4sentencecoverletter For much more FREE content, see the https://www.milewalkacademy.com/ -------------------- GET INTERVIEW INTERVENTION HARDCOVER FREE! -------------------- Get the Interview Intervention Hardcover, eBook, and Audiobook while supplies last! The $29 book is FREE. I bought it for you. I'm also adding in the $27 digital experience. I only ask that you pay $7 so my friends at the warehouse can pick it, pack it, and ship it. I'll send it anywhere in the world for $7! Get it here: http://bit.ly/YTFreeInterviewIntervention -------------------- FREE DOWNLOADS -------------------- DOWNLOAD: THE 4 SENTENCE COVER LETTER HERE: http://bit.ly/4sentencecoverletter DOWNLOAD: THE ULTIMATE PROFESSIONAL RESUME TEMPLATE HERE: http://bit.ly/ultimateresumetemplate -------------------- WANT MORE AWESOME COVER LETTERS? -------------------- HOW TO APPLY WHEN THERE IS NO JOB OPENING: 7 SENTENCE COVER LETTER: https://youtu.be/O4LcD3VjlfU BOSS HUNTING COVER LETTERS: https://youtu.be/tIzfFliaPYA -------------------- NOT GETTING YOUR RESUME NOTICED VIA THE ATS? -------------------- I recommend my resume format followed by using JOBSCAN. Get it FREE here: https://www.jobscan.co/andrew-lacivita -------------------- JOIN MY JOB SEARCH BOOT CAMP -------------------- Want the most advanced and effective job searching program created? Check out my Job Search Boot Camp to find your dream job fast! 5 sessions, lifetime access, live event (plus recordings), ongoing coaching and so much more: - Start in the right place (your headline/pitch, your why, your needs, your questions for the employers) - Create marketing material that wows (resume, cover letters, LinkedIn Profile) - Run the perfect job hunt (most advanced job search strategies) - Interview to win the job (ace any type of interview and learn advanced selling techniques) - Negotiate like a pro (learn the nuances, psychology and steps to get paid what you deserve) Learn more and ENROLL HERE: https://www.milewalkacademy.com/p/andrew-lacivita-job-search-boot-camp -------------------- CONNECT WITH ANDREW -------------------- Join Andrew's email list: http://milewalk.com/mwblog Get Andrew's books and training: https://www.milewalkacademy.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/andylacivita Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/andrewlacivita Twitter: https://twitter.com/arlacivita LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewlacivita Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/andrewlacivita iTunes free podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/tips-for-work-life-andrew/id1120387046 -------------------- SUMMARY: -------------------- Modern-day cover letter is your introduction—of any kind—to the employer. There are essentially three ways this occurs: 1. Cover Letter 2. Email (with attached resume) 3. Applicant Tracking System (ATS) Your “cover letter” has three goals: 1. Explain why you’ve contacted the employer. 2. Provide insight on who you are and what you offer. 3. Show enthusiasm and interest in hearing (back) from the employer. You can accomplish these three goals in four sentences, which I discuss in the video. You can also grab the free download to see the exact format! If you have haven’t seen How To Build the Ultimate Professional Resume, check it out because some of the cover letter content references your resume. Get that RESUME TEMPLATE HERE: http://bit.ly/ultimateresumetemplate -------------------- ABOUT ANDREW -------------------- Andrew LaCivita is an internationally recognized executive recruiter, award-winning author, trainer, and founder and chief executive officer of milewalk and the milewalk Academy. He’s dedicated his career to helping people and companies realize their potential, consulting to more than two hundred organizations and counseling more than eleven thousand individuals. He often serves as a trusted media resource and is the author of Interview Intervention, Out of Reach but in Sight, and The Hiring Prophecies. -------------------- ABOUT TIPS FOR WORK AND LIFE® -------------------- Tips for Work and Life® is a weekly careers, hiring, and motivational show full of helpful job search strategies, career management and acceleration tactics, recruitment techniques, and self-help aids with award-winning author, executive recruiter, and trainer Andrew LaCivita. Tips for Work and Life® has been cited by several sources as a Top 100 Careers and HR Blog. He includes these 7-20 minute multicast shows filmed with no teleprompter in one take as part of his blog and podcast. #milewalkacademy #coverletter #resume #jobinterview #jobsearch #careercoach #careercoaching #interviewintervention
Views: 875313 Andrew LaCivita
E2 IELTS Writing | How to score 8+ in Writing Task 2 with Jay!
 
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In this video, Jay from E2Language shares the most important tips there are for a high score in IELTS Writing Task 2. You'll be surprised at how some pretty simple strategies can lift your scores from 7 to 8. Jay himself took this test four times in order to really get to the bottom of why people continually get low scores. Check out the top, authentic tips needed to get 8+ on test day! Have a read of Jay's IELTS experience on the blog: http://bit.ly/2l1kTii Sign up for IELTS here: http://bit.ly/2ntt8Q7 Do you like these FREE videos? You can show your appreciation by DONATING a small amount of $ here: http://www.paypal.me/e2language -- even the smallest contribution will mean a LOT! E2Language offers online face-to-face tutorials run by expert English language teachers from all over the world! Visit our website for IELTS test preparation packages on offer: http://bit.ly/2otr0fi Follow us on social media for helpful tips and updates regarding IELTS preparation and the IELTS speaking: Blog: https://blog.e2language.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/e2language/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/e2language Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/e2language/
Views: 1001454 E2 IELTS
12 Common Errors in Academic English – and how to fix them!
 
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What's "academic writing"? If you're in school or university, you must know the difference between general English and academic English. Watch this important lesson to avoid the most common mistakes students make in academic writing. In your own language, the difference between these two modes of writing might not be that great, but in English, there are a lot of differences depending on the context. So even if you know your grammar and write a correct sentence, you might still be wrong because the structure or tone was not appropriate for an academic setting! Watch this video and learn how to write correctly and get higher grades in an academic environment. Then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/12-common-errors-in-academic-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca. And in today's lesson, I'll explain twelve common errors that students make in academic English. Now, what's academic English? It's the English that you need to use in school, college, or university when you're reading, writing, listening, and speaking -- okay -- ideally, but most importantly, when you're writing. Now, what's the difference between academic English and general English? Well, academic English in general -- there are many differences, but in general, academic English is more formal; it's more objective, and also, it has to use a lot of referencing. You always have to let people know where you got your information from. You have to cite the source. You have to give the source. You can't claim to write something and claim it as your own. Okay? If you do that, that's called "plagiarism". It's a very serious offense in academic circles. But today, we're not going to talk about how to reference a source. We're going to talk about the two other aspects: How to write more formally and objectively, and what are the ten common errors that students make when they are not formal enough. Okay? So not ten, twelve. Here we go. So first of all, using contractions. All of these are what you should not do, okay? So avoid using contractions. Sorry. In this case, don't use contractions at all. So don't say "don't"; say "do not". Don't say "isn't"; say "is not". All right? That's academic English. Next, avoid phrasal verbs. So for example, instead of saying "go up" -- "Prices went up. -- say, "Prices increased." Instead of saying "take away", say "removed". Avoid these multi-part verbs. All right? It's not as formal. Next, avoid idioms. Instead of saying, "It was A1", say, "It was excellent." All right? Avoid slang. Don't say "kids"; say "children". Use the proper terminology for various subjects. Avoid pronouns. So for example, instead of saying, "You can see from the graph..." -- all right. We use the pronoun "you". Instead of that, say, "The graph shows..." all right? Next, avoid negatives. For example, instead of saying, "Something is not effective", just say, "It is ineffective." Instead of saying something is "not positive", say, "It's negative." So avoid these kinds of negatives. Next, avoid clichés. Now, what are "clichés"? "Clichés" are a kind of idiom, basically -- commonly used expressions. All right? And so on. Kind of a common wisdom about different things. And so you want to avoid these kinds of expressions. For example, instead of saying, "When all is said and done" -- all right? We use that in conversation, but you don't want to use it in your academic writing. Instead of saying that, you'd probably use an expression like "in conclusion". All right? So next, there are certain kinds of punctuation -- there are actually lots of rules about punctuation. And the kind of punctuation, the style of punctuation that you use in academic writing depends on the style guide that you have been asked to follow in your school, college, or university. Some very well-known style guides are the MLA or APA. These are certain style guides, and they tell you everything about how you need to write, what rules you need to follow, what are the rules of punctuation and of quotations marks, of this and that. Okay? A lot more than what I'm covering here. But in general, I can just tell you that we don't see that many exclamation marks in academic writing, okay? We do see a lot of semicolons. All right? That's kind of -- when do we use a semicolon? Do you remember? Okay. What's the difference between a period and a semicolon? A period clearly divides two sentences. And a semicolon has one sentence which is a complete sentence; then you put the semicolon. You do not capitalize the next letter, and the next sentence is connected, and you want to show that it's connected to the first sentence, which is a very academic, intellectual, philosophical thing to do. So learn to use semicolons if you're in university especially.
IELTS General: Writing Task 1  – 14 Top Tips!
 
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I've trained thousands of students for success on their IELTS exam by using these 14 tips! Now it's your turn. You'll learn what you MUST do to get the highest score on your IELTS General Writing Task 1. Find out how to easily identify the type and purpose of each letter, and how to start and end your letter perfectly. Learn to save time and effort by using standard expressions. Understand the scoring criteria, so you know exactly what to do and what NOT to do. Visit http://www.GoodLuckIELTS.com for a free guide to the IELTS, and download my free resource at https://www.engvid.com/ielts-general-task-1-letter-writing/ with sample letters, sample topics, key expressions, tips, and much more. Good luck! Take the quiz on this lesson: https://www.engvid.com/ielts-general-writing-task-1/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. If you need to do the IELTS general exam, I'm sure it's for a very important reason. Perhaps you're trying to immigrate to another country, or get admission to a college program, or join a professional training program. Whatever your reason, I know you want to get the highest marks possible. Right? Of course. So I'm going to help you to do exactly that in one particular area of the exam, and that's in your writing section. Now, in the writing section there are two parts, one is a letter and one is an essay. In this lesson we will focus on how you can get the highest marks possible in the letter-writing section. Okay? The 14 tips that I'm going to give you I promise you, if you apply each one of these things, step by step you're going to get more and more marks. Okay? So stick with me and we will go through them. Let's get started. So, the first thing you have to identify when you read the letter-writing task is: What type of letter am I being asked to write? Is it a formal letter, is it a semi-formal letter, or is it an informal letter? Well, how do you know that? Well, you can know it in a few ways and I'm going to explain them, but one of the ways that you can know it is to look at the second point that you need to understand, is to identify the purpose of the letter because some purposes are more formal than other purposes. All right? For example, some formal letters might ask you to request information; or apply for a job; or complain about a product or a service, maybe to an airline, maybe to a store, something like that; or to make a suggestion or a recommendation. All right? To a shopping mall, to a restaurant, something like that. These are more formal situations. These are when we are writing to people or companies that we don't know. All right? That's the clue: You don't have anybody's name, you just have the name of the company. All right. Semi-formal letters might include things like this: Complaining to a landlord; or explaining something, a problem or a situation to a neighbour; or asking a professor for permission to miss an exam or to submit your assignment late. Whatever it is. Okay? The details vary. Doesn't matter. And here, what's...? What identifies the semi-formal? The semi-formal we know it's still a kind of a formal situation, but here we usually do know somebody's name. You would know the name of your landlord, or your professor, or your neighbour, for example. Right? So that means something in terms of the way that you write the letter, the language, the tone, the style. All of this is affected by whether it's formal, semi-formal, or informal. And I'll explain more to you as we go along. Now, examples of informal letters might be where you're being asked to invite a friend, or thank a friend, or apologize to a friend, or ask for advice from someone that you know. Okay? Here what's important is that you really know this person well and you're probably going to call them by first name. So I'm going to explain exactly how all of this translates into the next step, which is how you begin your letter. So the first step was to identify the type of letter. Second step, the purpose. Now the third step is to open and close the letter correctly. Once you've done steps one and two, you will know how to do this step. Because if it's a formal letter then you start with: "Dear Sir" or "Madam", and you end with: "Yours faithfully". Okay? That's how it is. If it's a semi-formal letter, you will start with something like: "Dear Mr. Brown" or "Dear Ms. Stone" or "Mrs. Stone". "Ms." Is when you don't know if a woman is married or not, or if she's just a modern woman. And you end the semi-formal letter with something like: "Yours sincerely". Okay? What we're trying to do is to match up the formality of the situation with these terms that we're using. Okay? The opening and closing salutations they're called, these are called. All right? Next is the informal one.
Writing is Painless 2: Sentence Errors
 
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Sentence structure is the building block of writing a solid essay (see the video on sentence structure!). When you don't follow the "rules," you end up with sentence errors. This video illustrates what you DON'T want to do!
Views: 20526 Saundra Rinehart
Writing - Transitions - THEREFORE, THUS, CONSEQUENTLY
 
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http://www.engvid.com Learn how to use "therefore" and "thus" to show you have reached a conclusion. These transitions will improve your writing by helping you link ideas. In this lesson, we will look at transitions of conclusion and consequence to help ideas flow and improve our writing styles. I'll also teach you how you can use words like "so", "then", "hence", and "as a result" for the same purpose. Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/writing-transitions-therefore-thus-consequently/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi, again. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is -- actually, I had a few requests for it. So I'm not going to mention names right now because there are too many to mention. But some people asked me about transitions, again, specifically, "therefore" and "thus". But I figured I would do the whole package because they can all work together. If you're writing essays, you can use more than one of these, more than two of these, especially for longer essays. So first, we're going to look at the differences or similarities -- as the case may be -- of these words and when and how they are used. Okay? So the words we're looking at today are "therefore", "thus", "consequently", "so", "then, "hence", and the expression "as a result". Okay? So again, all of these are transitions. I'll put it here. So a little review. What is a transition? A transition is like a bridge that connects two ideas. Okay? So what are we connecting here? What are the ideas that we want to connect? We want to connect a logical conclusion. Okay? Or we want to connect a consequence. What is a "consequence"? A consequence is, basically, a result. So for example, in life, we make choices, we make decisions, and then, we have to live with the consequences, whatever those choices bring us. Okay? So there's a very, very slight difference in these three words, especially. These are the three that I want you to use most on essays if you're going to be writing essays. Okay? We use "therefore" -- again, it's more of a mathematical word, but we use it, obviously, to write, as well. When we have a premise, from there premise, we generally reach a conclusion. Now, what is a "premise"? A "premise" is an idea that we believe to be true. And because we believe it is true, from that truth we reach a conclusion. Okay? I think everybody knows a very famous "premise + conclusion" sentence. "I think" -- premise -- "I believe that I think, therefore I am." That's the conclusion I reach. Because I think, I am. Okay. Don't be confused. It's not "because". Premise and conclusion, but I'm just trying to simplify it a little bit. "Thus" means "result". Now, it's a little bit different from "consequence". "Result" means a result of the last argument. Okay? And "consequence" is -- again, it's a result, but a consequence. Something's going to happen as a result of the thing before. Now, it's very, very important to remember, something had to be mentioned before you can use any of these words. Okay? All of these words and whatever sentence or clause or whatever comes after it is in relation to what came before. Okay? I said something before; this is my conclusion now. Or this is the result of what happened or this is the consequence. More informally, we can use "so" also to talk about a consequence or a result. We use "then". So, "This happened. Then, I did this." Not "then" like time, like sequence. "Then" means more like, "This happened, so I did this." "This happened. Then, I did that as a result of the first thing." Now, a lot of people ask me about this word, "hence". The first thing I will say is don't use it. One, it's a bit old-fashioned and a bit snobby. And two, most people don't use it correctly anyway. I personally don't like this word, but if you must use it, then, remember it's also like a consequence. Use it instead of "thus" -- probably instead of "therefore". And of course, very casual, "as a result". Okay? So before we look at this -- all of these individually, let's look at some examples. "I am cold." Okay? This is the situation. "I am cold. Therefore, I'll put on a coat." [Coughs] Excuse me. Actually, you know what? Let me change this. Sorry. I'll put a period here. If I were going to use "therefore" with this, I would start a new sentence. All of these words can be used to start a sentence or mid-sentence. But some of them are better used to start. Some of them are better used in the middle. "I'm cold. Therefore, I'll put on a coat."
How to Write an Introduction to an Argumentative Essay
 
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https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays This is a sample video from a full video tutorial course that teaches you how to improve your academic essay writing. The course is hosted on Udemy. To learn more, preview a selection of videos, and get a HUGE DISCOUNT on the signup price, click the link below: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays Many students enter college without the skills necessary to succeed simply because they were never properly taught how to write essays. This course aims to overcome this problem by offering a systemic framework for essay writing that removes the mystery and presents a clear path for moving from idea to outline to completed first draft. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION A Brief Introduction to the Course SECTION 2: WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS SO IMPORTANT? Good Writers Rule the World SECTION 3: WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure SECTION 4: HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing for Discovery versus Writing for Presentation Why Rewriting is Important (And Why Students Don’t Think So) How to Deal with Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block SECTION 5: WHAT IS MY IDEAL WRITING WORKFLOW? The Right Way to Think About Outlining My Ideal Writing Workflow Tools for Mind-Mapping, Outlining and Drafting The Writing Tools I Use: A Quick Introduction to Scrivener SECTION 6: WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using Scrivener A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template SECTION 7: FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part1: The Assignment Part 2: Initial Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References and Citations SECTION 8: HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The Number One Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing SECTION 9: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY The Minimal Five-Part Structure of a Good Argumentative Essay Writing the Introduction Writing the Conclusion The Essay: “Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms? Analysis: The Introduction Analysis: First Argument Analysis: Second Argument Analysis: Third Argument Analysis of the Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations Analysis: Conclusion The Essay: An Improved Version SECTION 10: WHAT IS PLAGIARISM AND HOW CAN I AVOID IT? What is Plagiarism? Downloading and Buying Whole Papers Cutting and Pasting from Several Sources Changing Some Words But Copying Whole Phrases Paraphrasing Without Attribution The Debate Over Patchwriting SECTION 11: HOW SHOULD I CITE SOURCES IN MY ESSAY? When Should I Cite a Source? What Needs to be Cited? How to Cite: Mark the Boundaries Citing Exact Words Citing a Longer Quotation Citing a Source But Not Quoting Do I Have to Cite Information That is “Common Knowledge”? Citation Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, oh my! SECTION 12: WRAPPING UP Thank You GET A HUGE DISCOUNT ON THIS COURSE: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/philosophyfreak?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 286859 Kevin deLaplante
Complaint Letter--How to Write an Effective Letter of Complaint
 
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Want results? Here's how to master the business writing format of the complaint letter for a product or service you purchased that didn't pan out.
Views: 109310 David Taylor
What Is The Style Of Language?
 
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Compared with writing, effective oral style is characterized by the following shmoop guide to kathryn stockett writing in help. Report writing language and style faculty of engineering science spoken vsthe help shmoop. Open resources for the learning styles and strategies of effective language learners style in google booksacademic writing english, lund university. Original from, the university of michiganlength, 470 feb 21, 2011 english language is no exception when it comes to variation and style important recognise differences just as. Unit 3 language and style in literary texts. One attractive feature of structured a conversational style writing or speaking is informal, like private conversation flowery language uses many complicated words that are intended mar 4, 2015 when giving feedback to students on their written work, tutors often comment aspects and. In this chapter, we give guidance on how to write sentences for maximum report writing language and style. Language style dictionary definition. The richness and variety of language is part what makes this book so appealing intriguing unit 3 style in literary texts you will learn to help your students notice the special ways which used paper presents results a comparative investigation into learning styles strategies effective ineffective learners. The style of a piece writing is the way in which features language are used to convey meaning, typically but not always within constraints more widely accepted conventions usage, grammar, and speling sheet language, or computer that expresses presentation structured documents. An example of language style is bureaucratise, the words, jargon and abbreviations which are used by government some types diction almost never advisable in writing. Objective does not mean that you avoid taking a position; Rather, it means different styles of english, from formal written style to informal oral style, with examples. Words used to describe writing or speech style synonyms and language & development centre text analysis identifying different styles. The other component of sentence meaning is word apr 18, 2013 academic language should be clear, unambiguous and objective. This section covers guidelines relating to writing style and presentation design. In the column on right below you can what is more effective in most speaking situations called oral style. Language style is defined as the choice of words used by a specific group people when they speak. Language style defined yourdictionary language url? Q webcache. They may criticise the language some writing styles to identify when comparing and contrasting texts degrees of formality – Such as vocabulary, slang, use idiomatic language, phrasal this is first four chapters about style in news. Subjects for title, style in languagepublisher, m. Chapter 10 language & style basics the news manual. First, one must recognize that the meaning of any sentence comprises two parts meanings words it contains and s
Views: 163 Another Question II
Learn Korean - How to Greet People in Korean
 
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Click here to get our FREE App & More Free Lessons at KoreanClass101: https://goo.gl/47wjFA Learn common Korean greetings with our Korean in Three Minutes series! In Korea, manners are important, and this step-by-step video teaches you some of the basics you need to be polite while speaking Korean. A native Korean teacher will explain the simple phrases necessary. This is the fastest, easiest way to pick up basic Korean! In this lesson, you'll learn how to use some common Korean greetings. If you learned a lot with this video, stop by our Korean language learning website and get other language learning content including great videos just like this one, audio podcasts, review materials, blogs, iPhone applications, and more. Find out more, go to: https://goo.gl/47wjFA
Speaking English - How to answer the phone
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Practice speaking on the phone with me, Emma! Do you know how to speak on the phone? Do you feel nervous talking on the phone? In this survival English video, I teach you common expressions to use on a phone call. By learning these expressions, your telephone conversations will become clearer and you will understand more. You can practice these expressions by taking our quiz. http://www.engvid.com/speaking-english-how-to-answer-the-phone/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma. And in today's lesson, we are going to be learning some important telephone expressions. Okay? I know a lot of students get very scared when they have to talk on the phone, and it's understandable; it can be very scary when you can't see the person's face when you're talking to them. So one great idea if you're afraid of talking on the phone in English is to memorize key expressions that we use all the time. This way, it will improve your listening, you will know what people will probably say on the phone, and your speaking will improve too. All right? Now, in this video, we're actually going to practice these expressions together. In my pocket, I have my cellphone. All right? So what is going to happen is I will teach you an expression, and then I will pretend to be on the phone, you can pretend to be on the phone too. I will say something, and you say the correct expression to me. All right? So, if you don't understand, that's okay - you will in a moment. Let's get started. Now, when somebody calls you... "Ring, ring, ring, ring" First thing you say is: "Hello?" As in a question. "Hello?" All right? And then what happens? The person who's calling asks a question. They can do this in different ways. I've listed four different ways, the most common. Sometimes they'll say: "Is __________ there, please?" "Is Emma there, please?", "Is Daniella there, please?" "Is Yvonne there, please?" Okay? A very common way. And notice: "please", very important to be polite. You can also say: "This is __________" - Emma - "calling for _________." Whoever you're calling. So, if I'm calling you, I might say: "Oh, hello. This is Emma calling for Daniel", "This is Emma calling for Joseph.", "This is Emma calling for Pete." Okay? So this is a common expression, especially if you're at work, this is the one we would use a lot at work. This one is a little more informal; you'd probably use this one more if you're calling your friends or calling someone in not a business situation. This is also another informal one: "Is __________ in?" So all of these blanks are the name of the person who the caller wants to speak to. "Is Emma in?", "Is John in?", "Is Mary in?" Okay. So, again: "Hello. Is Mary in?" Informal. Last one: "May I please speak to __________?" Emma. "May I please speak to Mary?", "May I please speak to the doctor?" All right? This one is more formal. So we have sort of formal/informal, formal, informal, and last one, formal. All right, so let's get your phone out. All right? Whether you have a real cellphone or your hand, and let's practice a statement. So you're going to be calling me. You're going to use one of these expressions. Pick whichever one you want and practice it. All right? Let's get started. "Ring, ring, ring, ring." "Hello?" Perfect. All right? So you can watch this video again and again; practice, practice, practice until you have it memorized, until it is easy for you. All right, now how do I respond or how..? How does the person you're calling respond? If you say: "Is Emma there, please?" I would say: "Speaking." Which means: "Yes, it's me, it's Emma." I wouldn't say that, I would just say: "Speaking." Or I could say: "__________ speaking. How can I help you?" [SM1]"Emma speaking.", "Emma speaking. How can I help you?" "This is __________." [SM2]"This is Emma." Or: "This is he.", "This is she." All right? So again, these represents the... The name of the person. This... These blanks are names. All right? So let's try one. I want you to pick any of these. All right? Now, I'm sorry - there are so many of you, I probably will not pick your name when I ask this question. So today, I am going to call you all "Bob". I'm sorry if that's a problem, but today, you are Bob. All right? So I want you to either say: "Speaking.", "Bob speaking.", "This is Bob." Just for practice. All right. So get your phone ready. "Ring, ring, ring, ring" So you say: "Hello?" And I say: "Is Bob there, please?" What do you say? Good, very good. All right, so let's learn some more expressions. Okay, great. So we've gone through the first part of a phone call. - "Hello, is Emma there, please?" -"Speaking." All right? Now what? What if someone calls you and you pick up, but they're not looking for you; they're looking for your brother, they're looking for your mother, they're looking for someone else - what do you say?