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Atmospheric Pressure
 
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This video explains the basic concepts of Atmospheric Pressure! To view the entire course for free, visit our website here: https://dontmemorise.com/course/index.php?categoryid=52 Don’t Memorise brings learning to life through its captivating FREE educational videos. To Know More, visit https://DontMemorise.com New videos every week. To stay updated, subscribe to our YouTube channel : http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseYouTube Register on our website to gain access to all videos and quizzes: http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseRegister Subscribe to our Newsletter: http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseNewsLetter Join us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseFacebook Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dontmemorise Follow us : http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseBlog
Views: 201304 Don't Memorise
Atmospheric Pressure
 
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Atmospheric pressure plays an essential role in respiration and the function of many devices, including water pumps, syringes and drinking straws. The video explains pascals and psi and includes a demonstration revealing the presence of atmospheric pressure.
Views: 376179 ScienceOnline
Physical Geography:-(वायुदाब/Air Pressure) जानिए वायुदाब क्या होता है? [Hindi]
 
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Atmospheric pressure, sometimes also calledbarometric pressure, is the pressure within the atmosphere of Earth (or that of another planet). In most circumstances atmospheric pressure is closely approximated by thehydrostatic pressure caused by the weight ofair above the measurement point. Aselevation increases, there is less overlying atmospheric mass, so that atmospheric pressure decreases with increasing elevation. Pressure measures force per unit area, with SI units of Pascals (1 pascal = 1 newton per square metre, 1 N/m2). On average, a column of air with a cross-sectional area of 1 squarecentimetre (cm2), measured from mean (average) sea level to the top of Earth's atmosphere, has a mass of about 1.03kilogram and exerts a force or "weight" of about 10.1 newtons or 2.37 lbf, resulting in a pressure at sea level of about 10.1 N/cm2 or 101 kN/m2 (101 kilopascals, kPa). A column of air with a cross-sectional area of 1 in2 (6.45 cm2) would have a mass of about 6.65 kg and a weight of about 65.4 N or 14.7 lbf, resulting in a pressure of 10.1 N/cm2 or 14.7 lbf/in2. In the United States, atmospheric pressure near sea level is commonly rounded to 15 lbf/in2, and expressed as "15 psi" (15 pounds per square inch.) https://youtu.be/_0rqRMm_Eew https://youtu.be/Ngz6wFPtKvI https://youtu.be/xUp-X0jAvCc
Views: 19946 Study Lovers
What Is the Pressure of Earth's Atmosphere at Sea Level? : Astronomy & the Solar System
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehoweducation Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehoweducation The pressure of Earth's atmosphere at sea level has about 20 different answers, all of which are right. Find out about the pressure of Earth's atmosphere at sea level with help from an experienced educator in this free video clip. Expert: Eylene Pirez Filmmaker: bjorn wilde Series Description: The solar system is one of the most unique and interesting topics that we as humans have the pleasure of studying. Learn about astronomy and the stars with help from an experienced educator in this free video series.
Views: 4811 eHowEducation
Physics - Thermodynamics: (1 of 1) Air Pressure at Altitude
 
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Visit http://ilectureonline.com for more math and science lectures! In this video I will show you how to calculate the change in air pressure from the bottom to the top of a mountain.
Views: 13213 Michel van Biezen
What is the average amount of air pressure in the sea level?
 
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Views: 246 Question & Answer
What is Sea Level?
 
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FREE FACT: An oblate spheroid is a special case of an ellipsoid where two of the semi-principal axes are the same size. A special thanks to our Subbable.com supporters: Robby Weisenfeld Gustav Delius Ike https://www.youtube.com/TheNilFacts And to Audible.com - FREE audiobook at http://www.audible.com/minutephysics MinutePhysics is on Google+ - http://bit.ly/qzEwc6 And facebook - http://facebook.com/minutephysics And twitter - @minutephysics Minute Physics provides an energetic and entertaining view of old and new problems in physics -- all in a minute! Music by Nathaniel Schroeder http://www.soundcloud.com/drschroeder Thanks to Nima Doroud for contributions. Created by Henry Reich
Views: 3122763 minutephysics
Why don't we get crushed by atmospheric pressure? | #aumsum
 
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Topic: Atmospheric Pressure Why don't we get crushed by atmospheric pressure? Hey. Did you hear that? His ears popped. Is this related to atmospheric pressure? Yes. We know that our earth is surrounded by a layer of air called the atmosphere. The gravitational force of earth constantly pulls this atmosphere towards itself. Due to this, the atmosphere exerts a pressure on the surface of the earth as well as on the objects present on its surface. This pressure exerted by the atmosphere is called the atmospheric pressure. This atmospheric pressure outside our body is balanced by the air pressure present inside our body. When the atmospheric pressure decreases, it becomes less than the air pressure inside us. Now, to balance the pressure inside and outside our ears, the air present inside rushes out. Whereas, when the atmospheric pressure increases, it becomes more than the air pressure inside us. So, to balance the pressure inside and outside our ears, the outside air rushes in. This movement of air results in that sudden pop. Have you noticed this before? Has your water bottle ever got crushed once your airplane landed? This happens because of changes in the atmospheric pressure. Generally, the atmospheric pressure in the bottle is equal to that on the surface of the earth. Whereas, in an airplane the atmospheric pressure is low as compared to that on the surface of the earth. During the flight, when you open the bottle and drink some water in the airplane, the atmospheric pressure in the bottle becomes low. This is because the low pressure air present in the airplane occupies the place of water which you just drank. However, when the airplane lands and you come out of the plane, the pressure outside the bottle, that is, the atmospheric pressure on the surface of earth is high as compared to the pressure inside the bottle. Hence, the outside air exerts a greater pressure on the surface of the bottle than the inside air. As a result, the bottle gets crushed. Wow. How is he able to lift such a heavy car? Are we also powerful enough to handle such a huge amount of pressure? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about 14.7 psi. This means that the atmosphere is exerting 14.7 pounds of force on every square inch of our body which is really huge. So, why don't we feel this immense pressure? This is because various parts of our body such as ears, nose, lungs and stomach also contain air which exerts pressure on the atmosphere which is equal to the atmospheric pressure. In this way, the atmospheric pressure and the air pressure present inside our body cancel each other. As a result, we don't get crushed by the atmospheric pressure.
Views: 224411 It's AumSum Time
Air Pressure explained
 
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Air Pressure explained
Views: 676435 Sc1648
Professor Proves There Is No 14.7psi Atmospheric Pressure at Sea Level
 
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This atmospheric hoax has been going on too long and needs to come to a stop. You are being pressurized into accepting pseudoscience as real science. The so called 'Earth' is flat and the sooner you can get you head around the idea the sooner you can move on.
Views: 563 THE LIGHT IS ON
Structure of the Atmosphere
 
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The atmosphere is an envelope of air, made up of various gasses, that surrounds the Earth and rests on its surface. The atmosphere has mass, weight, and an indefinite shape. The atmosphere is composed of 78 percent nitrogen, 21 percent oxygen, and 1 percent other gases, such as argon or helium. Some of these elements are heavier than others. The heavier elements, such as oxygen, settle to the surface of the Earth, while the lighter elements rise up to higher altitudes. Most of the atmosphere’s oxygen is contained in the area below 35,000 feet. Although there are various kinds of pressure, as pilots, we are mainly concerned with atmospheric pressure. It is one of the basic factors affecting weather, helps to create lift for an aircraft, and actuates important flight instruments, including the altimeter, airspeed indicator, vertical speed indicator, and manifold pressure gauge. Air is very light, but it has mass and is affected by gravity. Therefore, like any other substance, it has weight, and because of its weight, it has force. Since air is a fluid substance, this force is exerted equally in all directions, and the effect of this force on bodies within the air is called pressure. Under standard conditions, at sea level, the average pressure exerted by the weight of the atmosphere is approximately 14.70 pounds per square inch, or 1,013.2 millibars. The atmosphere’s thickness is limited; therefore, the higher the altitude, the less air there is above. For this reason, the weight of the atmosphere at 18,000 feet is one-half what it is at sea level. Atmospheric pressure varies with time and location. Due to the changing atmospheric pressure, a standard reference was developed. The standard atmosphere at sea level is a temperature 15 °C and a surface pressure of 29.92 inches of mercury, or 1,013.2 millibars. The standard temperature lapse rate is approximately 2 °C per thousand feet up to an altitude of 36,000 feet. The standard pressure lapse rate is approximately 1 "of mercury per 1,000 feet of altitude gain to 10,000 feet. Any temperature or pressure that differs from the standard lapse rate is considered nonstandard temperature and pressure. Pressure altitude is the height above a standard datum plane, which for pilots is a theoretical level where the weight of the atmosphere is 29.92 "Hg or 1,013.2 mb as measured by a barometer. If the altimeter is set for 29.92 "Hg, the altimeter will display pressure the altitude. As atmospheric pressure changes, the standard datum plane may be below, at, or above sea level. Pressure altitude is important as a basis for determining airplane performance, as well as for assigning flight levels to airplanes operating at or above 18,000 feet. The density of air has significant effects on the aircraft’s performance because as air becomes less dense, it reduces aircraft performance. Engine power available is decreased, because the engine takes in less air. Thrust becomes limited because a propeller is less efficient in thin air, and lift is reduced because the thin air exerts less force on the airfoils. Density altitude is defined as pressure altitude corrected for nonstandard temperature. As the density of the air increases, aircraft performance increases, and conversely as air density decreases aircraft performance decreases. A decrease in air density means a high density altitude; an increase in air density means a lower density altitude. The conditions that result in a high density altitude are high elevations, low atmospheric pressures, high temperatures, high humidity, or some combination of these factors. Lower elevations, high atmospheric pressure, low temperatures, and low humidity are more indicative of low density altitude. In the atmosphere, both temperature and pressure decrease with altitude. The decrease in pressure reduces density, and the decrease in temperature increases density. One force has to overcome the other, and the fairly rapid drop in pressure as altitude is increased usually has the dominating effect. Therefore, you can expect the density to decrease with altitude. Water vapor is lighter than air; therefore, moist air is lighter than dry air. As the water content of the air increases, the air becomes less dense, increasing density altitude and decreasing performance. Air is lightest or least dense when it is completely saturated. Humidity, or relative humidity, refers to the amount of water vapor contained in the atmosphere, and is expressed as a percentage of the maximum amount of water vapor the air can hold. This amount varies with temperature. Warm air holds more water vapor, while colder air holds less. Perfectly dry air that contains no water vapor has a relative humidity of zero percent, while saturated air, which cannot hold any more water vapor, has a relative humidity of 100 percent. This lesson is derived from the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge.
Views: 40504 Will Liebhaber
Partial Pressure of Water Vapor in Moist Air
 
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Description of the partial pressure concept. Ideal gas equation relations involving total pressure, water vapor partial pressure and humidity ratio (absolute humidity).
Views: 2062 Bing Guo
What is the average pressure of the atmosphere on the sea level?
 
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Views: 26 Question & Answer
वातावरणीय दाब Atmospheric Pressure Class 8 Science Marathi by DiscoverPhysics
 
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The hypsometric equation, also known as the thickness equation, relates an atmospheric pressure ratio to the equivalent thickness of an atmospheric layer under the assumptions of constant temperature and gravity. It is derived from the hydrostatic equation and the ideal gas law. Pascal's law (also Pascal's principle or the principle of transmission of fluid-pressure ) is a principle in fluid mechanics that states that pressure at a point, has infinite direction, and thus a pressure change at any point in a confined incompressible fluid is transmitted throughout the fluid such that the same change occurs everywhere. The law was established by French mathematician Blaise Pascal in 1647–48. What is the value for atmospheric pressure? Standard sea-level pressure, by definition, equals 760 mm (29.92 inches) of mercury, 14.70 pounds per square inch, 1,013.25 × 103dynes per square centimetre,1,013.25 millibars, one standard atmosphere, or 101.325 kilopascals. What is atmospheric pressure on human body? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about14.7 psi. This means that the atmosphere is exerting 14.7 pounds of force on every square inch of our body which is really huge. What is considered low atmospheric pressure? When the air pressure drops, so does the mercury level."Atmospheric pressure can also be measured in millibars (mb), with a "bar" being roughly equivalent to one atmosphere ofpressure (one atmosphereequals 1.01325 bars). One bar is equivalent to 29.6 in. Hg.A barometer reading of 30 inches (Hg) is considered normal. What is the definition of pressure in science? Pressure, in the physical sciences, the perpendicular force per unit area, or the stress at a point within a confined fluid. ... Absolute pressure of a gas or liquid is the total pressure it exerts, including the effect of atmospheric pressure. An absolute pressure of zero corresponds to empty space or a complete vacuum. What is the simple definition of pressure? Pressure means how much something is pushing on something else. It is expressed as force per unit area: P=F/A. In technology, pressure is often specified in multiples of atmospheric pressure. It can also be defined as the thrust [compressive force acting perpendicularly to the surface of a body] acting per unit area. What is called pressure? pressure. Posted by: Margaret Rouse. Pressure is an expression of force exerted on a surface per unit area. The standard unit of pressure is the pascal (Pa), equivalent to one newton per meter squared (N/m 2 or N. What are 5 units of pressure? pascalpound per square inchPapsi1 atm1.01325 ×10514.6961 Torr133.32219.337×10−31 psi6.895×103≡ 1 lbf/in2 How do you calculate the pressure? Pressure and force are related, and so you cancalculate one if you know the other by using the physics equation, P = F/A. Becausepressure is force divided by area, its meter-kilogram-second (MKS) units are newtons per square meter, or N/m2. What is a pressure in science? Pressure, in the physical sciences, the perpendicular force per unit area, or the stress at a point within a confined fluid. ... Absolutepressure of a gas or liquid is the total pressure it exerts, including the effect of atmospheric pressure. What are some examples of pressure? Examples of fluid motion because of pressure include breathing, and air currents (weather). When you breathe in, you move a diaphragm that lowers the pressure inside your lungs. Higher pressureair outside your body is sucked into the lungs to fill the gap. Sea and land breezes work similarly. How do you calculate water pressure? Find Water Pressure of Upright Cylinder. Determine the water pressure at the bottom of a full, upright cylinder by dividing the volume by the product of pi (?) multiplied by radius squared (R^2): V = ?R^2. This gives the height. If the height is in feet, then multiply by 0.4333 to get pounds per square inch (PSI). How do you calculate hydrostatic pressure? The pressure in a liquid at a given depth is called the hydrostatic pressure. This can be calculatedusing the hydrostatic equation: P = rho * g * d, where P is thepressure, rho is the density of the liquid, g is gravity (9.8 m/s^2) and d is the depth (or height) of the liquid. Learn about what physics actually is, why it's awesome, and why you should come with me on a ride through understanding the wacky universe in which we live. ######################### DiscoverPhysics is a Collection of Best Videos of ... CREATIVE COMMONS VIDEOS (reuse allowed) FROM YOUTUBE.COM. DiscoverPhysics is an Educational Non-Profit with a Mission to expand free Education, access to Scientific Research. Your Advice & Suggestions will be much Appreciated and Welcomed. [email protected] For details please visit the following site's. https://physics.uchicago.edu/ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics https:
Views: 20 DiscoverPhysics
Hypsometric Equation |Thickness Equation | Atmospheric Pressure  at Sea Level Explanation Tutorial
 
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The hypsometric equation, also known as the thickness equation, relates an atmospheric pressure ratio to the equivalent thickness of an atmospheric layer under the assumptions of constant temperature and gravity. It is derived from the hydrostatic equation and the ideal gas law. Pascal's law (also Pascal's principle or the principle of transmission of fluid-pressure ) is a principle in fluid mechanics that states that pressure at a point, has infinite direction, and thus a pressure change at any point in a confined incompressible fluid is transmitted throughout the fluid such that the same change occurs everywhere. The law was established by French mathematician Blaise Pascal in 1647–48. What is the value for atmospheric pressure? Standard sea-level pressure, by definition, equals 760 mm (29.92 inches) of mercury, 14.70 pounds per square inch, 1,013.25 × 103dynes per square centimetre,1,013.25 millibars, one standard atmosphere, or 101.325 kilopascals. What is atmospheric pressure on human body? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about14.7 psi. This means that the atmosphere is exerting 14.7 pounds of force on every square inch of our body which is really huge. What is considered low atmospheric pressure? When the air pressure drops, so does the mercury level."Atmospheric pressure can also be measured in millibars (mb), with a "bar" being roughly equivalent to one atmosphere ofpressure (one atmosphereequals 1.01325 bars). One bar is equivalent to 29.6 in. Hg.A barometer reading of 30 inches (Hg) is considered normal. What is the definition of pressure in science? Pressure, in the physical sciences, the perpendicular force per unit area, or the stress at a point within a confined fluid. ... Absolute pressure of a gas or liquid is the total pressure it exerts, including the effect of atmospheric pressure. An absolute pressure of zero corresponds to empty space or a complete vacuum. What is the simple definition of pressure? Pressure means how much something is pushing on something else. It is expressed as force per unit area: P=F/A. In technology, pressure is often specified in multiples of atmospheric pressure. It can also be defined as the thrust [compressive force acting perpendicularly to the surface of a body] acting per unit area. What is called pressure? pressure. Posted by: Margaret Rouse. Pressure is an expression of force exerted on a surface per unit area. The standard unit of pressure is the pascal (Pa), equivalent to one newton per meter squared (N/m 2 or N. What are 5 units of pressure? pascalpound per square inchPapsi1 atm1.01325 ×10514.6961 Torr133.32219.337×10−31 psi6.895×103≡ 1 lbf/in2 How do you calculate the pressure? Pressure and force are related, and so you cancalculate one if you know the other by using the physics equation, P = F/A. Becausepressure is force divided by area, its meter-kilogram-second (MKS) units are newtons per square meter, or N/m2. What is a pressure in science? Pressure, in the physical sciences, the perpendicular force per unit area, or the stress at a point within a confined fluid. ... Absolutepressure of a gas or liquid is the total pressure it exerts, including the effect of atmospheric pressure. What are some examples of pressure? Examples of fluid motion because of pressure include breathing, and air currents (weather). When you breathe in, you move a diaphragm that lowers the pressure inside your lungs. Higher pressureair outside your body is sucked into the lungs to fill the gap. Sea and land breezes work similarly. How do you calculate water pressure? Find Water Pressure of Upright Cylinder. Determine the water pressure at the bottom of a full, upright cylinder by dividing the volume by the product of pi (?) multiplied by radius squared (R^2): V = ?R^2. This gives the height. If the height is in feet, then multiply by 0.4333 to get pounds per square inch (PSI). How do you calculate hydrostatic pressure? The pressure in a liquid at a given depth is called the hydrostatic pressure. This can be calculatedusing the hydrostatic equation: P = rho * g * d, where P is thepressure, rho is the density of the liquid, g is gravity (9.8 m/s^2) and d is the depth (or height) of the liquid. ######################### DiscoverPhysics is a Collection of Best Videos of ... CREATIVE COMMONS VIDEOS (reuse allowed) FROM YOUTUBE.COM. DiscoverPhysics is an Educational Non-Profit with a Mission to expand free Education, access to Scientific Research. Your Advice & Suggestions will be much Appreciated and Welcomed. [email protected] For details please visit the following site's. https://physics.uchicago.edu/ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics https://www.britannica.com/physics Will update soon. https://m.facebook.com/DiscoverPhysics https://www.quora.com/profile/Amir-Khan-2092/ https://DiscoverPhysics
Views: 4 DiscoverPhysics
Highest Barometric Pressure Ever Recorded on Earth | Mini Ice Age 2015-2035 (265)
 
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Extremely out of season typhoon TOKAGE in the West Pacific, Latest ever recorded Hurricane OTTO in the Gulf of Mexico and the Highest ever recorded barometric pressure on Earth over Mongolia. Make Money Now Off Weather Predictions Here - https://tradegenius.co/go/ref/23 Rid Your Body of Unwanted Toxins Now! https://www.getthetea.com Support ADAPT 2030 on PATREON http://www.patreon.com/adapt2030 ADAPT 2030 Mini Ice Age FB Page https://www.facebook.com/Miniiceage Don't get caught un-prepared stock up on survival food today! http://foodforliberty.com/adapt2030 David's Website http://www.oilseedcrops.org Hurricane Otto Caribbean https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CyH1dGrXUAEigIN.jpg https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CyCcLLJUUAAAUfm.jpg https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CyCUx4ZXUAAPheW.jpg https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CyCBkh1XEAIwlMX.jpg https://twitter.com/RyanMaue https://twitter.com/BigJoeBastardi Cut off low, cold for California https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CyIQnHkUQAAelxi.jpg https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CyIQn9hUoAAEtlI.jpg https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CyQat00W8AAp8NP.jpg Intense global high and low temperature differences https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CyI5t04WIAImN7e.jpg https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CyIOnG8VIAE8XK4.jpg Highest Pressure Recorded http://www.westernpacificweather.com/2016/11/21/severe-cold-and-near-record-breaking-high-pressure/ http://www.ogimet.com/show_foremaps.php?lang=en&niv=SFC&date=20161127&run=00&proy=018&zone=CH00&drun=20161127_00 http://www.westernpacificweather.com/surface-analysis-2/ https://watchers.news/2016/11/21/extraordinary-high-pressure-cold-surge-north-east-asia/ Highest Sea Level Air Pressure Above 750 meters https://wmo.asu.edu/content/highest-sea-lvl-air-pressure-above-700m http://www.westernpacificweather.com/2016/11/21/severe-cold-and-near-record-breaking-high-pressure/ https://twitter.com/anthonywx https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CxwqDhiXcAAKSCL.jpg https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CxwqDhlWEAAC_q4.jpg Typhoon/Tropical Storm TOKAGE West Pacific http://www.cwb.gov.tw/V7e/observe/satellite/Sat_EA.htm http://www.cwb.gov.tw/V7e/prevent/typhoon/ty.htm? http://www.westernpacificweather.com/author/robspeta/
Views: 5543 Adapt 2030
Atmospheric pressure - Video Learning - WizScience.com
 
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"Atmospheric pressure" is the pressure exerted by the weight of air in the atmosphere of Earth . In most circumstances atmospheric pressure is closely approximated by the hydrostatic pressure caused by the weight of air above the measurement point. On a given plane, low-pressure areas have less atmospheric mass above their location, whereas high-pressure areas have more atmospheric mass above their location. Likewise, as elevation increases, there is less overlying atmospheric mass, so that atmospheric pressure decreases with increasing elevation. On average, a column of air one square centimeter in cross-section, measured from sea level to the top of the atmosphere, has a mass of about 1.03 kg and weight of about 10.1 N . Atmospheric pressure is sometimes called barometric pressure. The standard atmosphere is a unit of pressure equal to 101325 Pa or 1013.25 hectopascals or millibars. Equivalent to 760 mmHg , 29.92 inHg, 14.696 psi. The mean sea level pressure is the atmospheric pressure at sea level or the station pressure adjusted to sea level assuming that the temperature falls at a lapse rate of 6.5 K per km in the fictive layer of air between the station and sea level. This is the atmospheric pressure normally given in weather reports on radio, television, and newspapers or on the Internet. When barometers in the home are set to match the local weather reports, they measure pressure adjusted to sea level, not the actual local atmospheric pressure. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric+pressure, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
Views: 2355 Wiz Science™
The atmosphere of the sea wind storm formation?
 
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Views: 11 Question & Answer
What is air pressure?
 
00:49
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Views: 1906 Question & Answer
Manometer Pressure Problems, Introduction to Barometers - Measuring Gas & Atmospheric Pressure
 
13:24
This chemistry video tutorial explains how to solve manometer pressure problems in addition to explaining how manometers work. It also provides an introduction into barometers which are used to measure atmospheric pressure. Manometers are used to measure the pressure of a gas by measure the height difference between the fluid based mercury columns and adding or subtracting that value from the atmospheric pressure. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Pressure reduction to sea level
 
06:13
Lemme know if you want the powerpoint...
Views: 302 FruityFriday
What is Atmospheric Pressure in simple words? | Value of  1 atm | DiscoverPhysics
 
07:20
What is atmospheric pressure in simple words? That pressure is called atmospheric pressure, or air pressure. It is the force exerted on a surface by the air above it as gravity pulls it to Earth.Atmospheric pressure is commonly measured with abarometer. ... One atmosphere is 1,013 millibars, or 760 millimeters (29.92 inches) of mercury. What is the value for atmospheric pressure? The altimeter setting in aviation is an atmospheric pressure adjustment. Average sea-level pressure is 1013.25 mbar (101.325 kPa; 29.921 inHg;760.00 mmHg). What is atmospheric pressure on human body? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about14.7 psi. This mea What is the value for atmospheric pressure? The altimeter setting in aviation is an atmospheric pressure adjustment. Average sea-level pressure is 1013.25 mbar (101.325 kPa; 29.921 inHg;760.00 mmHg). What is atmospheric pressure in a nutshell? An atmosphere (atm) is a unit of measurement equal to the average air pressure at sea level at a temperature of 15 degrees Celsius (59 degrees Fahrenheit).One atmosphere is 1,013 millibars, or 760 millimeters (29.92 inches) of mercury. Atmospheric pressure drops as altitude increases. What is atmospheric pressure on human body? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about14.7 psi. This means that the atmosphere is exerting 14.7 pounds of force on every square inch of our body which is really huge. What is considered low atmospheric pressure? When the air pressure drops, so does the mercury level."Atmospheric pressure can also be measured in millibars (mb), with a "bar" being roughly equivalent to one atmosphere ofpressure (one atmosphereequals 1.01325 bars). One bar is equivalent to 29.6 in. Hg.A barometer reading of 30 inches (Hg) is considered normal. Pascal's law (also Pascal's principle or the principle of transmission of fluid-pressure ) is a principle in fluid mechanics that states that pressure at a point, has infinite direction, and thus a pressure change at any point in a confined incompressible fluid is transmitted throughout the fluid such that the same change occurs everywhere. The law was established by French mathematician Blaise Pascal in 1647–48. What is the value for atmospheric pressure? Standard sea-level pressure, by definition, equals 760 mm (29.92 inches) of mercury, 14.70 pounds per square inch, 1,013.25 × 103dynes per square centimetre,1,013.25 millibars, one standard atmosphere, or 101.325 kilopascals. What is atmospheric pressure on human body? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about14.7 psi. This means that the atmosphere is exerting 14.7 pounds of force on every square inch of our body which is really huge. What is considered low atmospheric pressure? When the air pressure drops, so does the mercury level."Atmospheric pressure can also be measured in millibars (mb), with a "bar" being roughly equivalent to one atmosphere ofpressure (one atmosphereequals 1.01325 bars). One bar is equivalent to 29.6 in. Hg.A barometer reading of 30 inches (Hg) is considered normal. How do you calculate water pressure? Find Water Pressure of Upright Cylinder. Determine the water pressure at the bottom of a full, upright cylinder by dividing the volume by the product of pi (?) multiplied by radius squared (R^2): V = ?R^2. This gives the height. If the height is in feet, then multiply by 0.4333 to get pounds per square inch (PSI). How do you calculate hydrostatic pressure? The pressure in a liquid at a given depth is called the hydrostatic pressure. This can be calculatedusing the hydrostatic equation: P = rho * g * d, where P is thepressure, rho is the density of the liquid, g is gravity (9.8 m/s^2) and d is the depth (or height) of the liquid. Learn about what physics actually is, why it's awesome, and why you should come with me on a ride through understanding the wacky universe in which we live. ######################### DiscoverPhysics is a Collection of Best Videos of ... CREATIVE COMMONS VIDEOS (reuse allowed) FROM YOUTUBE.COM. DiscoverPhysics is an Educational Non-Profit with a Mission to expand free Education, access to Scientific Research. Your Advice & Suggestions will be much Appreciated and Welcomed. [email protected] For details please visit the following site's. https://physics.uchicago.edu/ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics https://www.britannica.com/physics Will update soon. https://m.facebook.com/DiscoverPhysics https://www.quora.com/profile/Amir-Khan-2092/ https://DiscoverPhysics.business.site/ https://www.patreon.com/developers https://yahoo.com/DiscoverPhysics https://twitter.com/DiscoverPhysics http://baidu.com/DiscoverPhysics
Views: 19 DiscoverPhysics
Vapor Pressure Basic Introduction, Normal Boiling Point, & Clausius Clapeyron Equation - Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into vapor pressure. Vapor pressure is the partial pressure at which a substance's rate of evaporation is equal to the rate of condensation. This tutorial explains how to calculate the vapor pressure and normal boiling point of a substance using the clausius clapeyron equation. The normal boiling point is the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid is equal to the atmospheric pressure at sea level. Vapor pressure increases with temperature. The boiling point of a substance is inversely related with elevation. Substances with high intermolecular forces tend to have a high boiling point and a low vapor pressure. Intermolecular forces included in this tutorial are london dispersion forces and hydrogen bonds - a special kind of dipole dipole interaction. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE | INTRODUCTION | Value For Atmospheric Pressure ? DiscoverPhysics
 
18:50
What is atmospheric pressure in simple words? That pressure is called atmospheric pressure, or air pressure. It is the force exerted on a surface by the air above it as gravity pulls it to Earth.Atmospheric pressure is commonly measured with abarometer. ... One atmosphere is 1,013 millibars, or 760 millimeters (29.92 inches) of mercury. What is the value for atmospheric pressure? The altimeter setting in aviation is an atmospheric pressure adjustment. Average sea-level pressure is 1013.25 mbar (101.325 kPa; 29.921 inHg;760.00 mmHg). What is atmospheric pressure on human body? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about14.7 psi. This mea What is the value for atmospheric pressure? The altimeter setting in aviation is an atmospheric pressure adjustment. Average sea-level pressure is 1013.25 mbar (101.325 kPa; 29.921 inHg;760.00 mmHg). What is atmospheric pressure in a nutshell? An atmosphere (atm) is a unit of measurement equal to the average air pressure at sea level at a temperature of 15 degrees Celsius (59 degrees Fahrenheit).One atmosphere is 1,013 millibars, or 760 millimeters (29.92 inches) of mercury. Atmospheric pressure drops as altitude increases. What is atmospheric pressure on human body? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about14.7 psi. This means that the atmosphere is exerting 14.7 pounds of force on every square inch of our body which is really huge. What causes atmospheric pressure? The weight of the air above you creates atmospheric pressure. Same for diving deep underwater with hydrostatic pressure.Atmospheric pressure is caused by the weight of the Earth's atmosphere. ... At higher elevations, more and more of the atmosphere is below you, so the pressure at that elevation is less. What is considered low atmospheric pressure? When the air pressure drops, so does the mercury level."Atmospheric pressure can also be measured in millibars (mb), with a "bar" being roughly equivalent to one atmosphere ofpressure (one atmosphereequals 1.01325 bars). One bar is equivalent to 29.6 in. Hg.A barometer reading of 30 inches (Hg) is considered normal. Pascal's law (also Pascal's principle or the principle of transmission of fluid-pressure ) is a principle in fluid mechanics that states that pressure at a point, has infinite direction, and thus a pressure change at any point in a confined incompressible fluid is transmitted throughout the fluid such that the same change occurs everywhere. The law was established by French mathematician Blaise Pascal in 1647–48. What is the value for atmospheric pressure? Standard sea-level pressure, by definition, equals 760 mm (29.92 inches) of mercury, 14.70 pounds per square inch, 1,013.25 × 103dynes per square centimetre,1,013.25 millibars, one standard atmosphere, or 101.325 kilopascals. What is atmospheric pressure on human body? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about14.7 psi. This means that the atmosphere is exerting 14.7 pounds of force on every square inch of our body which is really huge. What is considered low atmospheric pressure? When the air pressure drops, so does the mercury level."Atmospheric pressure can also be measured in millibars (mb), with a "bar" being roughly equivalent to one atmosphere ofpressure (one atmosphereequals 1.01325 bars). One bar is equivalent to 29.6 in. Hg.A barometer reading of 30 inches (Hg) is considered normal. How do you calculate water pressure? Find Water Pressure of Upright Cylinder. Determine the water pressure at the bottom of a full, upright cylinder by dividing the volume by the product of pi (?) multiplied by radius squared (R^2): V = ?R^2. This gives the height. If the height is in feet, then multiply by 0.4333 to get pounds per square inch (PSI). How do you calculate hydrostatic pressure? The pressure in a liquid at a given depth is called the hydrostatic pressure. This can be calculatedusing the hydrostatic equation: P = rho * g * d, where P is thepressure, rho is the density of the liquid, g is gravity (9.8 m/s^2) and d is the depth (or height) of the liquid. ######################### DiscoverPhysics is a Collection of Best Videos of ... CREATIVE COMMONS VIDEOS (reuse allowed) FROM YOUTUBE.COM. DiscoverPhysics is an Educational Non-Profit with a Mission to expand free Education, access to Scientific Research. Your Advice & Suggestions will be much Appreciated and Welcomed. [email protected] For details please visit the following site's. https://physics.uchicago.edu/ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics https://www.britannica.com/physics Will update soon. https://m.facebook.com/DiscoverPhysics https://www.quora.com/profile/Amir-Khan-2092/ https://DiscoverPhysics.business.site/ https://w
Views: 3 DiscoverPhysics
Absolute Pressure vs Gauge Pressure - Fluid Mechanics - Physics Problems
 
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This physics video tutorial provides a basic introduction into absolute pressure and gauge pressure. The gauge pressure is the difference between the absolute pressure and the atmospheric pressure. A positive gauge pressure means the absolute pressure is above the atmospheric pressure. A negative gauge pressure means the absolute pressure is less than the atmospheric pressure. This fluid mechanics video contains plenty of practice problems. This video explains how to calculate the gauge pressure of a two fluid mixture such as oil and water. New Physics Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0o_zxa4K1BU6wPPLDsoTj1_wEf0LSNeR Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
How deep is the ocean? | Going to the deepest recorded ocean depth
 
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From the highest mountain peak to the deepest ocean trench, the surface of the Earth spans a total of 12.3 miles (19.8 kilometers) of vertical distance. Below the surface of the sea, water pressure increases rapidly. At a depth of 33 feet (10 meters), the pressure increases to two atmospheres (that is, equal to twice the pressure of air at sea level. Every 33 feet, the pressure increases by one atmosphere. Oceans cover about 71 percent of the Earth’s surface and support 50 percent of Earth’s species of life. The average depth of the ocean floor is 12,080.7 feet (3,682.2 m). The “deep sea” is said to begin at a depth of 5,900 feet (1,800 m). Below that depth, no sunlight penetrates the water and the sea appears completely black. This lightless area is called the Bathypelagic Zone. The deepest ocean depths are called the Hadopelagic Zone, deriving from the word “Hades.” At the bottom of the Mariana Trench, the pressure exceeds 1,100 atmospheres. Layers of the Ocean Scientists have divided the ocean into five main layers. These layers, known as "zones", extend from the surface to the most extreme depths where light can no longer penetrate. These deep zones are where some of the most bizarre and fascinating creatures in the sea can be found. As we dive deeper into these largely unexplored places, the temperature drops and the pressure increases at an astounding rate. The following diagram lists each of these zones in order of depth. Epipelagic Zone - The surface layer of the ocean is known as the epipelagic zone and extends from the surface to 200 meters (656 feet). It is also known as the sunlight zone because this is where most of the visible light exists. With the light come heat. This heat is responsible for the wide range of temperatures that occur in this zone. Mesopelagic Zone - 200 meters (656 feet) to 1,000 meters (3,281 feet Bathypelagic Zone - The next layer is called the bathypelagic zone. It is sometimes referred to as the midnight zone or the dark zone. This zone extends from 1,000 meters (3,281 feet) down to 4,000 meters (13,124 feet). Abyssopelagic Zone - The next layer is called the abyssopelagic zone, also known as the abyssal zone or simply as the abyss. It extends from 4,000 meters (13,124 feet) to 6,000 meters (19,686 feet). Hadalpelagic Zone - Beyond the abyssopelagic zone lies the forbidding hadalpelagic zone. This layer extends from 6,000 meters (19,686 feet) to the bottom of the deepest parts of the ocean. These areas are mostly found in deep water trenches and canyons. The deepest point in the ocean is located in the Mariana Trench off the coast of Japan at 35,797 feet (10,911 meters). The temperature of the water is just above freezing, and the pressure is an incredible eight tons per square inch. That is approximately the weight of 48 Boeing 747 jets. In spite of the pressure and temperature, life can still be found here. Invertebrates such as starfish and tube worms can thrive at these depths. Music description: NCM Epic Music Ender Guney https://youtu.be/Eg885bUr8uw
Views: 17793 KK Data
Atmospheric pressure
 
11:34
Atmospheric pressure is the force per unit area exerted on a surface by the weight of air above that surface in the atmosphere of Earth (or that of another planet). In most circumstances atmospheric pressure is closely approximated by the hydrostatic pressure caused by the weight of air above the measurement point. On a given plane, low-pressure areas have less atmospheric mass above their location, whereas high-pressure areas have more atmospheric mass above their location. Likewise, as elevation increases, there is less overlying atmospheric mass, so that atmospheric pressure decreases with increasing elevation. On average, a column of air one square centimeter in cross-section, measured from sea level to the top of the atmosphere, has a mass of about 1.03 kg and weight of about 10.1 N (2.28 lbf) (A column one square inch in cross-section would have a weight of about 14.7 lbs, or about 65.4 N). This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 299 Audiopedia
Water Lift Atmospheric Pressure Torricelli Vacuum 10 meter potential
 
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This water is held in place with atmospheric pressure pushing on the surrounding pond water. The Maximum lift of water is about 10 meters with regular air pressure. This is how mercury barometers worked. This is a RERELEASE of the video Uploaded on Jun 4, 2011 less the cool dramatic ending with music. The music used was 100% ROYALTY FREE garageband loops/music. TWO valves can allow for lift without losing much water. Amazing Water Trick! How to Suspend Water Without a Cup!
Views: 142604 GREENPOWERSCIENCE
Mean Sea Level Pressure and Domed Flat Earth
 
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Za srpski titl uključite cc, captions. Any connection between the mean sea level pressure and a domed flat Earth? Or winds are doing their job? Anyway, graphs are making more sense on a flat Earth... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_pressure https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/overlay=mean_sea_level_pressure/winkel3 https://iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu/maproom/Global/Atm_Circulation/Sea_Level_Pres.html Research flat Earth...even if it sounds stupid.
50 years of Sea Level Pressure Data for the US in R
 
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50 years of annually-average Sea Level Pressure (SLP) anomalies (=deviations from the long-term mean) in millibars for 16 cities in the U.S at or near the following locations. Video produced with R.
Views: 56 Jess the Geologist
Respiratory System, Part 2: Crash Course A&P #32
 
10:23
Can a paper bag really help you when you are hyperventilating? It turns out that it can. In part 2 of our look at your respiratory system Hank explains how your blood cells exchange oxygen and CO2 to maintain homeostasis. We'll dive into partial pressure gradients, and how they, along with changes in blood temperature, acidity, and CO2 concentrations, change how hemoglobin binds to gases in your blood. (And yes, we'll explain the paper bag thing too!) Table of Contents How Blood Cells Exchange Oxygen and CO2 2:23 Partial Pressure Gradients 2:41 How Hemoglobin Binds to Gases in the Blood 4:40 The Thing With The Bag 9:04 *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1342705 CrashCourse
Engineering Science (Air Pressure)
 
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The definition of air pressure is the force exerted onto a surface by the weight of the air. An example of air pressure is the average sea- level air pressure of 101.325 kPA
Views: 45 PTSN Official
Measurement of Pressure and Temperature
 
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Measurement of Pressure and Temperature Measuring Pressure The first device for measuring atmospheric pressure was developed by Evangelista Torricelli during the 17th century. Temperature Measuremen The device was called a “barometer” Baro = weight Meter = measure measuring atmospheric pressure An Early Barometer The normal pressure due to the atmosphere at sea level can support a column of mercury that is 760 mm high. Pressure pressure and temperature of gases barometer Is caused by the collisions of molecules with the walls of a container is equal to force/unit area how to measure atmospheric pressure Standard Pressure 1 standard atmosphere (atm) 101.3 kPa (kilopascals) Pressure Switch 14.7 lbs/in2 760 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) Differential Pressure 760 torr Pressure Pressure is the force created by the collisions of molecules with the walls of a container Temperature Logger Standard Molar Volume One mole of a gas at STP has a volume of 22.4 Liters Mole Relationships Mole Atoms or molecules Liters Grams 6.02 x 1023 Atomic Mass 22. 4 L 22.4 L
Views: 238 SliderBase
Can You Skydive From The International Space Station?
 
05:08
While the sight from the International Space Station is a beautiful one, jumping off of it won't be. It will be a deadly journey for any astronaut who jumps off the ISS to reach Earth's surface. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Most skydivers jump off a plane flying 3.8 km above the ground. But imagine jumping off something even higher, like the International Space Station. Unless you have a supersuit like Tony Stark, it's not gonna end well. But let's pretend Iron Man lends you one. Ok, ready? 3 … 2 … 1 … Jump! Wait … what? That's right, you wouldn't fall straight down. In fact, it'll take you at least 2.5 years before you reach the surface. So what's going on? Height isn't the main reason your fall takes so long. In fact, if you fell like a normal skydiver, it would only take about 2 hours. But the thing is, you don't fall straight down. You fall into orbit. The reason is speed. You see, the ISS might be called a station, but it's hardly stationary.  It's actually moving 12 times faster than a jet fighter. If you shot anything at that speed on Earth, by the time it was about to hit the ground, it would miss! In the same way, the ISS isn't floating in space, it's falling towards Earth and missing! And when you jump off the ISS, you're initially moving at that same speed. So you end up in orbit, too — at least for a while. Now, even though it's so high up, the ISS is pushing through a very thin atmosphere. And that friction slows it down. So the station fires engines to maintain speed and keep from crashing into the Earth. But sadly your supersuit doesn't come with engines strapped to your feet. This has two consequences: First, it means you can't maneuver and have to hope that any of those 13,000 chunks of space debris don't impale you. Second, without rockets to maintain your speed, you'll slow down and spiral toward Earth. But it won't be quick. The Chinese space station Tiangong 1, for example, about 2 years to fall out of orbit. On the ISS, you're higher up, so you'll take roughly 2.5 years. But once you strike the atmosphere, your long wait is over. And it's go time. As you re-enter, you have one goal: slow down. You're traveling at hypersonic speeds. So, if you deployed a parachute now, it'll shred to pieces. And that's not the only problem. Falling through the atmosphere at such break-neck speeds generates a lot of pressure on your suit — at least 8Gs of force — that's 8 times the gravity you feel at sea level. And if you're falling feet first, that'll push the blood away from your brain and toward your feet. So you'll probably pass out unless you're one of those fighter pilots who train to withstand up to 5Gs. Now, if you don't pass out, you may worry about the freezing temperatures up here.  But, it turns out, your suit's more likely to melt than freeze. You know how you can warm your hands by rubbing them together? Now imagine your supersuit rubbing against air molecules in the atmosphere at least 6 times the speed of sound. You'll heat up to about 1,650 ºC — hot enough to melt iron! In fact, the heat is so intense, it strips electrons from their atoms forming a pink plasma around you that will ultimately destroy suit. If that's not enough of a problem, the drag will rip off your limbs. But thankfully, Tony Stark has your back, and somehow, your supersuit holds with you intact. At 41 km up you've now reached the world record for highest skydive. In 2014, Alan Eustace wore a pressurized space suit as he rode a balloon up to this height. He broke the sound barrier on his way down before deploying his parachute and landed about 15 minutes after the drop. But you'll be falling much faster than Eustace — about 3 times the speed of sound. So, in reality, you're not going to slow down enough to safely deploy your chute. That's where Iron Man can help us one last time. By 1 km up you've reached the territory of ordinary skydivers who don't need fancy suits to survive. And at this point, your parachute can do its thing.  And it's finally time to land softly. Whew, what a ride! What sort of daring feat would you want us to try next? Let us know in the comments below. And thanks for watching. A special thanks to Shawn R Brueshaber at Western Michigan University and Kunio Sayanagi at Hampton University for their help with this video.
Views: 1733299 Science Insider
Measuring Gas Pressure and Atmospheric Pressure
 
16:10
To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry We'll learn about the amount of pressure that the air around us exerts, and we'll see how to measure pressure using a U tube barometer or a manometer with a vacuum. The units that we get are in mmH2O and mmHg. The amount of pressure changes depending on the altitude above or below sea level.
Views: 165975 Tyler DeWitt
Julius Sumner Miller: Lesson 10 - Atmospheric Pressure
 
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Put out your open hand - grab hold of a handful of air - there is NOTHING there! Or so it seems! But there is - there's a powerful lot of STUFF there -an enormous array of it! The ATMOSPHERE is a massive thing. The pressure of the air is about 15 pounds per square inch at sea level. On every square inch of everything there is a load of 15 pounds - very nearly. The average human being bears a load of some TWENTY TONS! The whole blanket of atmosphere which envelops the Earth weighs some 5000 million million tons! Fantastic! We show an array of enchanting DEMONSTRATIONS on THE PUSH OF THE AIR. A - We boil water in a tin can. We drive out all the air. We now stopper up the can. The water vapor in the can condenses - that is - it goes back into the liquid state. The pressure in the can is reduced. The atmosphere squeezes the can! The PUSH of the air is terrific. B - We do the same thing with another can but in this case we evacuate the can - we take out SOME of the air - with a vacuum pump. Again the great push of the air squeezes the can. C - A funnel has its open end covered with a stout rubber sheet. We take out some of the air. The atmosphere PUSHES the sheet in — the more air we take out the more it pushes in - and suddenly BANG - the sheet is burst apart by the PUSH of the air. D - "Suction" cups! This is bad language! There is NO SUCTION! We squeeze the "suction" cups together; we drive out the air between them. Then what? The atmosphere OUTSIDE pushes them together! And very strongly. E - We do the classic experiment of Otto von Guericke with the Magdeburg Hemispheres. In the original demonstration in the Public Square SIXTEEN HORSES pulled the hemispheres apart. But only eight were really necessary. See why? F - On a sheet of newspaper about 20" by 30" - that is - on an area of 600 square inches - there rests a load of atmosphere of some 9000 pounds. Fantastic! Now we wish to put this enormous load - this massive MASS - into motion by a short-lived impulsive blow. Remember the Sack of Bricks in Inertia? Newton said: "A body at rest wishes to remain at rest". And 9000 pounds - over FOUR TONS - has just too much inertia to be put into motion suddenly. So BANG! The board is broken because the great load of air does not wish to move. When the air is quiet the PUSH of the air is something to think about. Imagine what happens when this massive air is on the move - as in a hurricane or in a tornado. Cities are destroyed!
Views: 14090 Matthew Bryant
Atmospheric Rivers - Sea level pressure and precipitable water content
 
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Created to visually identify atmospheric rivers on the west coast of North America using sea level pressure and precipitable water content. For example, days 17 through 19 show a clear atmospheric river being funneled between low and high pressure systems. Another good example are days 83 - 85. Sea level pressure - shown by contour lines. Dashed = low pressure and solid = high pressure. Precipitable water content - shown by filled contours. White represents values under 2 cm and the color scale shows values greater than 2 cm according to the color bar. Movie created by Sol Kim for an honors thesis as an undergraduate student at UC Berkeley. Collaboration by Professor Norman Miller and graduate student Hoseok Lee (both UC Berkeley). Program: MATLAB. Data: NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis I. Contact: [email protected]
Views: 230 Sol Kim
M-ex Production s.r.o. – FOR BIKES 2019
 
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https://www.mex.cz/ https://high-live.cz/ Již 10. ročník veletrhu cyklistiky a dalšího sportovního vybavení FOR BIKES 2019, se letos konal opět na výstavišti v Praze – Letňanech. Nepřehlédnutelná expozice společnosti M-ex Production, na prestižním místě první výstavní haly, stále přitahovala zájemce z řad širší veřejnosti i profesionálních sportovců. Právě exponát společnosti M-ex Production, tedy speciální komora HIGH LIVE pro simulaci vysokohorského vzduchového prostředí získal prestižní ocenění v soutěži GRAND PRIX. Tento systém má řadu dalších možností využití, včetně běžných domácností. The 10th trade fair for cycling and other sports equipment For Bikes 2019, took place again at the Prague Trade Fair grounds in Prague Letňany. The trade fair boasted packed pavilions, plenty of new products, famous VIPs and 10,000s of visitors! Therefore the movers and shakers of the industry couldn't be missing. The unavoidable stand of the company M-ex Production in the prestigious location of the 1st pavilion constantly attracted visits from the wider public and professional sportsmen. The prestigious Grand Prix award was given to the exhibit of M-ex Production, the special High Live chamber for simulating high-altitude atmospheres. Interview: Milan Pecka - owner of M-ex Production s.r.o. We’re presenting our latest product, the Hypoxic chamber. This is technology that produces a hypoxic atmosphere for various indoor environments, e.g. exercising in fitness centres. This technology makes it possible to train in high-altitude conditions without having to go to the mountains. We can set here a range of altitudes, from 1,500 to 5,000 metres. The exhibited technology is set for 100 m3/hr. This has already been sold to the company AZ Fitness in Brno. It’ll be the first publicly-accessible hypoxic chamber in a gym in Czechia. This technology comes from Western Europe where it is commonly-used in gyms. These systems are currently only used in Czechia for research or special purposes. The system is composed of an oxygen generator, which is a compressor with a membrane system. This uses nano technology to adjust the oxygen’s partial pressure in the introduced atmosphere.. So without changing the pressure, we can change the amount of oxygen to between 10% and 18% from the standard 20.9% at sea level, as in the mountains. The generator creates the atmosphere and brings it into the exercise chamber in pipes via the expander. There’s a measuring gauge to show the oxygen levels, converted to the equivalent altitude. It shows the CO2 in ppm to show the contamination of the atmosphere from breathing. We measure the temperature and humidity. We also adjust the temperature to around 20°C. Just as with other exercise, it’s important to train regularly in the chamber. If you exercise 30 minutes in this environment, it’s the equivalent of training 3 times longer. The effects after exercising are also 3 times longer. This helps the organism to acclimatise to the effects of processing oxygen, e.g. increasing the number of red blood cells, improving performance, the function of mitochondria and the overall cardio-vascular performance of the body. The acclaimed LHTL method (Live High Train Low) says you should sleep at a high altitude (e.g. 2,500m) but live and train at a normal altitude. If you do this, your body will naturally acclimatise and your performances will improve. This can be useful not only in sport, but also in convalescence after an accident or exhaustion. You sleep deeply in this environment and are fully rested. We have a special series for this segment which we install in your homes. These are oxygen-generating systems which are connected directly to the bed in a closed bedroom as opposed to using a tent. In the morning, you leave back into normal atmosphere. Our company produces oxygen generators not just for sport, but also for controlling the atmosphere for servers and supercomputers. We can control the atmosphere in production processes to reduce the burning point. We produce oxygen generators for the chemical industry, working with oxygen levels like 0.5%. We have a large market in the food and drink industry producing a protective atmosphere for produce. HIGH-LIVE systém pro simulaci vysokohorské atmosféry Zařízení vyrábí modifikovanou atmosféru, která je přiváděna do speciálně upravené komory, ve které je uměle vytvořeno vysokohorské prostředí. V tomto prostoru je pak možno kondiční cvičení se zaměřením na aerobní zátěž. Výsledkem takového tréninku je zvýšení výkonu krevního oběhu v přenosu kyslíku do svalů. FOR BIKES, 29. – 31. 3. 2019, PVA – Letňany Veletrh cyklistiky / Cycling Trade Fair http://forbikes.cz/ The video was produced by the television and advertising company TVF http://www.tvf.cz Oldřich Brýža - managing director
Views: 2647 TVFBrno
Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is an ionization method used in mass.. Audio Article
 
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Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is an ionization method used in mass spectrometry which utilizes gas-phase ion-molecule reactions at atmospheric pressure (10 5 Pa), commonly coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). APCI is a soft ionization method similar to chemical ionization where primary ions are produced on a solvent spray. Pascal's law (also Pascal's principle or the principle of transmission of fluid-pressure ) is a principle in fluid mechanics that states that pressure at a point, has infinite direction, and thus a pressure change at any point in a confined incompressible fluid is transmitted throughout the fluid such that the same change occurs everywhere. The law was established by French mathematician Blaise Pascal in 1647–48. What is the value for atmospheric pressure? Standard sea-level pressure, by definition, equals 760 mm (29.92 inches) of mercury, 14.70 pounds per square inch, 1,013.25 × 103dynes per square centimetre,1,013.25 millibars, one standard atmosphere, or 101.325 kilopascals. What is atmospheric pressure on human body? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about14.7 psi. This means that the atmosphere is exerting 14.7 pounds of force on every square inch of our body which is really huge. What is considered low atmospheric pressure? When the air pressure drops, so does the mercury level."Atmospheric pressure can also be measured in millibars (mb), with a "bar" being roughly equivalent to one atmosphere ofpressure (one atmosphereequals 1.01325 bars). One bar is equivalent to 29.6 in. Hg.A barometer reading of 30 inches (Hg) is considered normal. What is the definition of pressure in science? Pressure, in the physical sciences, the perpendicular force per unit area, or the stress at a point within a confined fluid. ... Absolute pressure of a gas or liquid is the total pressure it exerts, including the effect of atmospheric pressure. An absolute pressure of zero corresponds to empty space or a complete vacuum. What is the simple definition of pressure? Pressure means how much something is pushing on something else. It is expressed as force per unit area: P=F/A. In technology, pressure is often specified in multiples of atmospheric pressure. It can also be defined as the thrust [compressive force acting perpendicularly to the surface of a body] acting per unit area. What is called pressure? pressure. Posted by: Margaret Rouse. Pressure is an expression of force exerted on a surface per unit area. The standard unit of pressure is the pascal (Pa), equivalent to one newton per meter squared (N/m 2 or N. What are 5 units of pressure? pascalpound per square inchPapsi1 atm1.01325 ×10514.6961 Torr133.32219.337×10−31 psi6.895×103≡ 1 lbf/in2 How do you calculate the pressure? Pressure and force are related, and so you cancalculate one if you know the other by using the physics equation, P = F/A. Becausepressure is force divided by area, its meter-kilogram-second (MKS) units are newtons per square meter, or N/m2. What is a pressure in science? Pressure, in the physical sciences, the perpendicular force per unit area, or the stress at a point within a confined fluid. ... Absolutepressure of a gas or liquid is the total pressure it exerts, including the effect of atmospheric pressure. What are some examples of pressure? Examples of fluid motion because of pressure include breathing, and air currents (weather). When you breathe in, you move a diaphragm that lowers the pressure inside your lungs. Higher pressureair outside your body is sucked into the lungs to fill the gap. Sea and land breezes work similarly. How do you calculate water pressure? Find Water Pressure of Upright Cylinder. Determine the water pressure at the bottom of a full, upright cylinder by dividing the volume by the product of pi (?) multiplied by radius squared (R^2): V = ?R^2. This gives the height. If the height is in feet, then multiply by 0.4333 to get pounds per square inch (PSI). How do you calculate hydrostatic pressure? The pressure in a liquid at a given depth is called the hydrostatic pressure. This can be calculatedusing the hydrostatic equation: P = rho * g * d, where P is thepressure, rho is the density of the liquid, g is gravity (9.8 m/s^2) and d is the depth (or height) of the liquid. Learn about what physics actually is, why it's awesome, and why you should come with me on a ride through understanding the wacky universe in which we live. ######################### DiscoverPhysics is a Collection of Best Videos of ... CREATIVE COMMONS VIDEOS (reuse allowed) FROM YOUTUBE.COM. DiscoverPhysics is an Educational Non-Profit with a Mission to expand free Education, access to Scientific Research. Your Advice & Suggestions will be much Appreciated and Welcomed. [email protected] For details please visit the followin
Views: 54 DiscoverPhysics
Why Atmosphere Pressure Doesn't Crush us? in Hindi : DiscoverPhysics
 
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Why are we not affected by the pressure of the atmosphere? The air pressure in our lungs, ears and stomachs is the same as the air pressure outside of our bodies, which ensures that we don't get crushed. Our bodies are also flexible enough to cope when the internal and external pressures aren't exactly the same. Why don t we feel the enormous atmospheric pressure acting on us? We can't feel the atmospheric pressure because our body is full of air also .The pressure inside lungs,blood vessels and several organs have the same pressurefrom inside as the atmospheric pressure is applied on our body from outside. ... Why do we notfeel large atmospheric pressure acting on us all the time? What happens if there is no atmospheric pressure? The remaining water would freeze. Eventually (long after surface life died), solar radiation would break atmospheric water into oxygen, which would react with carbon on the Earth to form carbon dioxide. The air would still be too thin to breathe. The lack ofatmosphere would chill the Earth's surface Why don t we collapse under the weight of the atmosphere? We can call this weight an external pressure, because it is pushing down on us. However, the reason we, nor other objects, are crushed by the weight of thisair is because this external pressure is balanced by our internal pressure. Pascal's law (also Pascal's principle or the principle of transmission of fluid-pressure ) is a principle in fluid mechanics that states that pressure at a point, has infinite direction, and thus a pressure change at any point in a confined incompressible fluid is transmitted throughout the fluid such that the same change occurs everywhere. The law was established by French mathematician Blaise Pascal in 1647–48. What is the value for atmospheric pressure? Standard sea-level pressure, by definition, equals 760 mm (29.92 inches) of mercury, 14.70 pounds per square inch, 1,013.25 × 103dynes per square centimetre,1,013.25 millibars, one standard atmosphere, or 101.325 kilopascals. What is atmospheric pressure on human body? Yes, to some extent we are also carrying a huge amount of pressure. At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about14.7 psi. This means that the atmosphere is exerting 14.7 pounds of force on every square inch of our body which is really huge. What is considered low atmospheric pressure? When the air pressure drops, so does the mercury level."Atmospheric pressure can also be measured in millibars (mb), with a "bar" being roughly equivalent to one atmosphere ofpressure (one atmosphereequals 1.01325 bars). One bar is equivalent to 29.6 in. Hg.A barometer reading of 30 inches (Hg) is considered normal. What are 5 units of pressure? pascalpound per square inchPapsi1 atm1.01325 ×10514.6961 Torr133.32219.337×10−31 psi6.895×103≡ 1 lbf/in2 How do you calculate the pressure? Pressure and force are related, and so you cancalculate one if you know the other by using the physics equation, P = F/A. Becausepressure is force divided by area, its meter-kilogram-second (MKS) units are newtons per square meter, or N/m2. What is a pressure in science? Pressure, in the physical sciences, the perpendicular force per unit area, or the stress at a point within a confined fluid. ... Absolutepressure of a gas or liquid is the total pressure it exerts, including the effect of atmospheric pressure. What are some examples of pressure? Examples of fluid motion because of pressure include breathing, and air currents (weather). When you breathe in, you move a diaphragm that lowers the pressure inside your lungs. Higher pressureair outside your body is sucked into the lungs to fill the gap. Sea and land breezes work similarly. How do you calculate water pressure? Find Water Pressure of Upright Cylinder. Determine the water pressure at the bottom of a full, upright cylinder by dividing the volume by the product of pi (?) multiplied by radius squared (R^2): V = ?R^2. This gives the height. If the height is in feet, then multiply by 0.4333 to get pounds per square inch (PSI). How do you calculate hydrostatic pressure? The pressure in a liquid at a given depth is called the hydrostatic pressure. This can be calculatedusing the hydrostatic equation: P = rho * g * d, where P is thepressure, rho is the density of the liquid, g is gravity (9.8 m/s^2) and d is the depth (or height) of the liquid. ######################### DiscoverPhysics is a Collection of Best Videos of ... CREATIVE COMMONS VIDEOS (reuse allowed) FROM YOUTUBE.COM. DiscoverPhysics is an Educational Non-Profit with a Mission to expand free Education, access to Scientific Research. Your Advice & Suggestions will be much Appreciated and Welcomed. [email protected] For details please visit the following site's. https://physics.uchicago.edu/ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics https://www.britannica.com/physics Will update soon. https:/
Views: 7 DiscoverPhysics
Mariana Trench The Deepest Place On Earth
 
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The Mariana Trench or Marianas Trench is the deepest part of the world's oceans. It is located in the western Pacific Ocean, to the east of the Mariana Islands. The trench is about 2,550 kilometres (1,580 mi) long but has an average width of only 69 kilometres (43 mi). It reaches a maximum-known depth of 10,994 m (± 40 m) or 6.831 mi (36,070 ± 131 ft) at the Challenger Deep, a small slot-shaped valley in its floor, at its southern end, although some unrepeated measurements place the deepest portion at 11.03 kilometres (6.85 mi). At the bottom of the trench the water column above exerts a pressure of 1,086 bars (15,750 psi), over 1000 times the standard atmospheric pressure at sea level. At this pressure the density of water is increased by 4.96%, making 95 litres of water under the pressure of the Challenger Deep contain the same mass as 100 litres at the surface. The temperature at the bottom is 1 to 4 °C. The trench is not the part of the seafloor closest to the center of the Earth. This is because the Earth is not a perfect sphere; its radius is about 25 kilometres (16 mi) less at the poles than at the equator. As a result, parts of the Arctic Ocean seabed are at least 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) closer to the Earth's center than the Challenger Deep seafloor. Xenophyophores have been found in the trench by Scripps Institution of Oceanography researchers at a record depth of 10.6 km (6.6 mi) below the sea surface. On 17 March 2013, researchers ed data that suggested microbial life forms thrive within the trench. The Mariana Trench is the deepest part of the world's oceans. It is located in the western Pacific Ocean, to the east of the Mariana Islands. The trench is about ... National Geographic HD Documentary, Nat Geo Wild, Nature & Wildlife The Deepest Place On Earth: Mariana Trench. Amazing Full HD Documentary, Nature ... Seven miles is a long way down... more than a mile deeper than Mt. Everest is up. To reach the deepest part of the Mariana Trench, James Cameron will ... The Mariana Trench or Marianas Trench is the deepest part of the world's oceans. It is located in the western Pacific Ocean, to the east of the Mariana Islands. Discovery Channel - The Deepest Place On Earth Mariana Trench HD Documentary **For more documentary you click here: ... The Mariana Trench or Marianas ...
Views: 9549 Trevonn Lakesha
Sea level anomalies from satellite altimetry
 
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This shows the difference from time average of sea level as measured by satellite over 20 years, from 1993 to 2012. It is based on the AVISO gridded dataset, and has had tides and the direct response to atmospheric pressure (the inverse barometer response) removed. Particularly prominent is the 1997-1998 El Niño event.
Views: 333 Chris Hughes
What Is The Meaning Of Psi In Pressure?
 
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Buy affordable compressors today pound per square inch conversion chart. The pound serves as the measure of weight or force, and square 16 jan 2017 pounds per inch (psi) is a measurement pressure in imperial psi also used tensile strength, defined i'm looking for transducer running into these different ratings. Since atmospheric pressure at sea level is around 14. The absolute air pressure at sea level is about 14. Psi, this will be added to any pressure reading made in air at sea level 24 jul 2017 psi definition is a unit of expressed pounds force per square inch area. What is meaning of lbf in and the relationship to bar? Pounds force per square inch pressure units which psi most looking for a new washer wondering what really means? When you first begin browsing washer, may this lesson, we are going define explain some let's go back unit that use represent. Pressure ratings, psi, psia, psid, psig, what do they mean? Home psi pounds per square inch pressure unit sensorsone. Psi what's the difference in pressure measurements. Wikipedia wiki pounds_per_square_inch url? Q webcache. Pounds per square inch wikipedia en. Imperial system) your value (pound per square inch, psi). It stands for pounds per square inch. I know what psi is, but do the other ratings mean? . What does psi mean? Psi definition meaning of what's the difference between psi, psia & psig? Setra systems. Pound per square inch conversion chart (stress and pressure cup vs. 715 torr the slang word acronym abbreviation psi means the definition of psi is 'pounds per square inch (pressure)' or 'greek letter' 12 mar 2015 pounds per square inch (psi) is a common unit for measuring pressure, but what does psi absolute and psi gauge mean? . Pressure measurement understanding psi, psia and psig. 13 oct 2014 nominal mean velocity from each, the maximum average pressure (map) for each, saami cup psi cartridge copper units pressure psi Per square inch wikipedia. Pressure definition, units, and conversions video & lesson pressure units conversion unit sengpielaudio. What does psi mean for air compressors? Expert market. Pressure conversion convert pascal, kpa, mpa, bar, torr, psi, atm. Air pressure what is the difference between units psi and psig pounds per square inch (psi)? Definition meaning measurement unit conversion convert. This is one of pressure conversion units unit convert psi pa kpa bar torr atmosphere or mechanical stress unit, p, symbol, definition, relation to si pascals (pa), kilopascal (kpa), mpa, torr, mmhg, psi, atm. What is pressure washer psi? Pressure buyers guide. What is psi? Definition of unit thoughtco. Definition pound square inch 14 apr 2010 pounds per inch, or psi, is the english unit of measure for pressure. Googleusercontent search. Pounds per square inch absolute (psia) is used to make it clear that the pressure relative a vacuum rather than ambient atmospheric. Per square inch wikipedia. Stress and pressure conversion, british u. They mean 32 psig, since it is as
Views: 678 S Answers
Storm surge in the Irish Sea Jan 2014.
 
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Storm surges are created when strong winds push water up against a coastline. Low atmospheric pressure associated with weather systems causes the sea level to rise even further. A storm surge in the Irish Sea can raise the average sea level by 1-1.5 metres over a large area.
Views: 2514 NOC news
What is air pressure in the human body?
 
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Views: 195 Question & Answer
Pressure Equation Derivation - A Level Physics
 
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Students studying the AS and A level CIE Physics need to learn this derivation for the Pressure Equation. Follow the step by step guide and LEARN it..
Views: 36581 Chris Gozzard
Vapor Pressure and Boiling
 
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The molecules leaving a liquid through evaporation create an upward pressure as they collide with air molecules. This upward push is called the vapor pressure. Different substances have different vapor pressures and therefore different boiling points. This is due to differing intermolecular forces between molecules. The vapor pressure of a liquid lowers the amount of pressure exerted on the liquid by the atmosphere. As a result, liquids with high vapor pressures have lower boiling points. Vapor pressure can be increased by heating a liquid and causing more molecules to enter the atmosphere. At the point where the vapor pressure is equal to the atmospheric pressure boiling will begin. In effect, without any external pressure the liquid molecules will be able to spread out and change from a liquid to a gaseous phase. The gas, as bubbles in the liquid, will rise to the surface and be released into the atmosphere. See: http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Core/Physical_Chemistry/Physical_Properties_of_Matter/States_of_Matter/Phase_Transitions/Boiling
Views: 155082 Wayne Breslyn
The rate of change of atmospheric pressure with respect to altitude h
 
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The rate of change of atmospheric pressure with respect to altitude is proportional to , provided that the temperature is constant. At C the pressure is kPa at sea level and kPa at m. (a) What is the pressure at an altitude of 3000 m? (b) What is the pressure at the top of Mount McKinley, at an altitude of 6187 m?
Views: 590 MSolved Tutoring
Calculating Planetary Surface Temperatures Made Easy
 
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1000Frolly channel relies on your generosity and support to keep up the fight against the forces of pseudo-science. Please assist of you can; Patreon https://www.patreon.com/1000Frolly I have decided to adhere to convention and replace the n with an M. This is to avoid confusion with n which is used by many as the number of moles - not the mean molecular weight. So the formula is now; T = PM/Rρ T = near-surface atmospheric temperature in Kelvin P = near-surface atmospheric pressure in kPa R = gas constant 8.314 ρ = near-surface atmospheric density in kg/m³ M = near-surface atmospheric mean molecular weight (grams per mole) Where is the supposed 33C "Greenhouse Effect"? A GHE of the size claimed by the IPCC or the 'mainstream' climate scientists simply can't be 'baked in' to this formula. Firstly you have the 'problem' of the claimed 33C from the GHE, which because of the gas law results incorporating auto-compression has disappeared. There is also the second problem that if the temperature can be accurately calculated by knowing just three gas parameters, then the climate sensitivity to CO2 has to be extremely low, not more than 0.02C which means that the CO2 alarm is totally unnecessary. In effect, the formula proves that 'extra' CO2 has no more effect than more of any other gas has on temperatures. A hypothesis is presented here that near-surface planetary temperatures on bodies with atmospheric pressures of over10kPa are significantly increased over and above the S-B black body law by a process known as adiabatic auto-compression and not the so-called "greenhouse effect". The proof lies in the formula shown here, which is derived from the Ideal gas law. It is demonstrated that by knowing just three near-surface gas parameters, the actual average near-surface atmospheric temperature of such bodies can be easily calculated. In this video, we look at a simple, alternative way to calculate the average surface atmospheric temperature of a planetary body which has a surface atmospheric pressure of over 10kPa. This turns out to be a re-arrangement of the Ideal Gas Law. Using this formula, the planetary surface temperature can be accurately determined by knowing just three gas parameters; - Average near-surface atmospheric pressure - Average near-surface atmospheric density - Near-surface mean atmospheric molecular weight This calls into question as to whether the probable 33C surface temperature enhancement on Earth - is really a "Greenhouse Effect" caused by greenhouse gases, or whether it has another cause; namely Adiabatic Auto-Compression. References; Here are the results at 1 bar of pressure (101.3kPa); Jupiter: 165 K (observed) vs 167 K (calculated) Saturn: 134 K (observed) vs 132.8 K (calculated) Uranus: 76 K (observed) vs 76.6 K (calculated) Neptune: 72 K (observed) vs between 68.5 K and 72.8 K (calculated) Use NASA figures; Jupiter; https://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/jupiterfact.html Saturn; https://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/saturnfact.html Uranus; https://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/uranusfact.html Neptune; https://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/neptunefact.html Fulchignoni, M., Ferri, F., Angrilli, F., Ball, A. J., Bar-Nun, A., Barucci, M. A., ... & Coradini,, M. (2005). In situ measurements of the physical characteristics of Titan's environment. Nature, 438(7069), 785-791. Lindal, G. F., Wood, G., Hotz, H., Sweetnam, D., Eshleman, V., & Tyler, G. (1983). The atmosphere of Titan: An analysis of the Voyager 1 radio occultation measurements. Icarus, 53(2), 348-363. NASA fact sheet data on the planets, (2017). Accessed 10/4/2017 https://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/ Schmidt, G. A., Ruedy, R. A., Miller, R. L., & Lacis, A. A. (2010). Attribution of the present‐day total greenhouse effect. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 115(D20). Principles, T., Nikolov, N., & Zeller, K. (2011). Unified Theory of Climate, poster session at the World Climate Research Program; http://www.wcrp-climate.org/conference 2011/ Robinson, T. D., & Catling, D. C. (2014). Common 0.1 bar tropopause in thick atmospheres set by pressure-dependent infrared transparency. Nature Geoscience, 7(1), 12-15. Wikipedia, Properties of Earth’s atmosphere, (2017). Accessed 6/4/2017. https://en.wiki pedia.org/wiki/Density_of_air Zasova, L. V., Ignatiev, N., Khatuntsev, I., & Linkin, V. (2007). Structure of the Venus atmosphere. Planetary and Space Science, 55(12), 1712-1728. Postscript; The formula also woks for the South Pole; 68.13 / (8.314.1.06/28.96) = 223.9 Kelvin (or -49 C) This is the correct average temperature at the South Pole; http://icecube.wisc.edu/pole/weather I have done a quick calculation of the climate sensitivity using this formula, and it is less than 0.03C. Also check out Stephen Wilde's website here; http://www.newclimatemodel.com/the-gas-constant-as-the-global-thermostat/
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Earth's atmosphere | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Earth's atmosphere 00:02:01 1 Composition 00:03:35 2 Structure of the atmosphere 00:03:44 2.1 Principal layers 00:05:05 2.1.1 Exosphere 00:06:23 2.1.2 Thermosphere 00:08:29 2.1.3 Mesosphere 00:10:08 2.1.4 Stratosphere 00:11:52 2.1.5 Troposphere 00:13:54 2.2 Other layers 00:17:14 3 Physical properties 00:17:23 3.1 Pressure and thickness 00:20:54 3.2 Temperature and speed of sound 00:22:02 3.3 Density and mass 00:23:31 4 Optical properties 00:24:06 4.1 Scattering 00:25:04 4.2 Absorption 00:26:16 4.3 Emission 00:27:46 4.4 Refractive index 00:28:28 5 Circulation 00:29:01 6 Evolution of Earth's atmosphere 00:29:11 6.1 Earliest atmosphere 00:29:34 6.2 Second atmosphere 00:31:39 6.3 Third atmosphere 00:33:47 6.4 Air pollution 00:34:23 7 Images from space Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The atmosphere of Earth is the layer of gases, commonly known as air, that surrounds the planet Earth and is retained by Earth's gravity. The atmosphere of Earth protects life on Earth by creating pressure allowing for liquid water to exist on the Earth's surface, absorbing ultraviolet solar radiation, warming the surface through heat retention (greenhouse effect), and reducing temperature extremes between day and night (the diurnal temperature variation). By volume, dry air contains 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen, 0.93% argon, 0.04% carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases. Air also contains a variable amount of water vapor, on average around 1% at sea level, and 0.4% over the entire atmosphere. Air content and atmospheric pressure vary at different layers, and air suitable for use in photosynthesis by terrestrial plants and breathing of terrestrial animals is found only in Earth's troposphere and in artificial atmospheres. The atmosphere has a mass of about 5.15×1018 kg, three quarters of which is within about 11 km (6.8 mi; 36,000 ft) of the surface. The atmosphere becomes thinner and thinner with increasing altitude, with no definite boundary between the atmosphere and outer space. The Kármán line, at 100 km (62 mi), or 1.57% of Earth's radius, is often used as the border between the atmosphere and outer space. Atmospheric effects become noticeable during atmospheric reentry of spacecraft at an altitude of around 120 km (75 mi). Several layers can be distinguished in the atmosphere, based on characteristics such as temperature and composition. The study of Earth's atmosphere and its processes is called atmospheric science (aerology). Early pioneers in the field include Léon Teisserenc de Bort and Richard Assmann.
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